The Halswell Family. compiled by. Mick Humphreys. October edition. Sir Charles Kemeys Tynte

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1 The Halswell Family compiled by Mick Humphreys October 2014 edition Sir Charles Kemeys Tynte i

2 This is a draft document, which was first created in It has been in constant course of preparation ever since. This will never cease. It is an incomplete document that contains errors and omissions, because it nothing more than a compendium of received information that has been checked and corroborated as far as the compiler's competence allows. It is only as complete as the information he has been given or found. Neither of these is very extensive. Please e mail the compiler with any amendments changes or corrections. They will be very welcome. Much of the research for the intial draft was done by David Jeanes and Jo Silby. Many others have helped since. Many thanks. Mick Humphreys Creechbarn Creech St Michael Taunton TA3 5PP mick@somersite.co.uk More Information at: ii

3 Table Of Contents Early History 1086 onwards 1 The House and Gardens 7 Ancestor Tree of Catherine de Gatcombe 15 Descendant Tree of Robert Halswell 18 Notes on Roger Halswell's Descendants 61 Pictures: family structures and Mill Wood 91 Index 100 iii

4 Somerset and the Domesday Book in What was the origin of your home town or village? Many of the names of these ancient domains were transported to the New World with early settlers in the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries, and in 18th century Australia and South Africa. At the time of the Domesday Book survey the largest landholder in the county of Somerset was Count Robert of Mortain, half brother of William, Duke of Normandy who is well documented for his well known contribution to the Battle of Hastings. He was granted 797 manors throughout England by the Duke. His seat was at Castle Montacute. Robert held 87 manors in Somerset. William de Moyon (Mohun, held 55 lordships in Somerset). Dunster Castle was his seat. His grandson, William would become the first Earl of Somerset. William was from Moion near St.Lo in Normandy. He brought many knights and men-at-arms to the Battle of Hastings. Also holding manors in Somerset was Walter de Douai, son of Urso of Douai near Lille in Normandy. He was also at the Battle of Hastings. He held 37 manors. Walter also held extensive lands in Devonshire and a great barony. From him were descended the Barons Bampton of Devonshire. He may have had two other brothers at Hastings, Fouque and Goselin. Roger Arundel also held 28 manors in Somerset. Most historic opinion gives him as kin of the great Roger de Montgomery, of Liseiux in Normandy, the first Earl of Arundel. He may have been a son or grandson. He had first settled in Salop but was appointed the castelan of Castle Arundel. Roger Montgomery, his grandfather(?) had commanded a wing of the Norman Army at the Battle of Hastings. From this family were descended the Earls Onslow, the Lords of Arundel, and the western families of Lanherne and Trerice. Alfred d Epaignes held 24 manors in Somerset at the Domesday. He was from Epaignes, near Pont Audemere in Eure in Normandy. Alfred was also granted lands as tenant in chief in Herefordshire and Dorset. In the latter county he was seated at Turnworth. Obviously of Spanish descent he was frequently known as Alvredus de Hispania or Yspania. His brother Herve also held in Somerset. From him are descended the Spains of Essex. Alfred, Herve and another brother, Auvrai were all at the Battle of Hastings. Alfred was also an under-tenant in Wiltshire, Somerset and Gloucestershire. Also holding many lordships was Roger de Courcelles (of the Pincerna family through his father William de Courcelles of St.Amand, Rouen in Normandy, who was at the Battle of Hastings). He was the ancestor of the Churchills and the Dukes of Marlborough. The following Tenants in Chief have holdings in Somerset. Under tenants are not shown at this time. Barons and their holdings William de Mohun Adsborough, Alcombe, Aley, Allercott, Avill, Bickham, Bishop s Lydeard, Bratton, Brewham, Broadwood, Brompton Ralph, Broomfield, Brown, Cheriton, Chubworthy, Clatworthy, Combe Sydenham, Cutcombe, Dunster, East Lydeard, Elworthy, Hartrow, Heathfield, Holford St.Mary, Holnicote, Kilton, Knowle, Langham, Leigh(Milverton), Leigh(Winsham), Luxborough, Minehead, Newton(Bicknoller), Nunney, Oatrow, Old Stowey, Poleshill, Quarme, Runnington, Shotmansford, Staunton, Stocklinch, Stoke sub Hamdon, Street, Tolland, Torweston, Westowe, West Quantoxhead, Willett, Woolston, Roger de Courcelles Alsholt, Alier, Ashcott, Ashington, Ashway, Barrington, Barton St David, Blackmore, Broford, Brympton, Chilton Trinity, Chilton Trivett, Clayhill, Coleford, Combe(Withycombe), Curry Mallet, Currypool, Doulting, Doverhay, Downscombe, Earnshill, East Lydford, Eleigh, Emble, Enmore, Exford, Farleigh Hungerford, Fivehead, Gothelney, Halsway, Hill, Holford, Huish, Idson, Kilvey, Knowle St Giles, Lexworthy, Limington, Littleton, Long Sutton, Monksilver, Moortown, Mudford Sock, Oake, Otterhampton, Pardlestone, Perry, Petherham, Pightly, Pillock s Orchard, Pixton, Ponteside, Puckington, Radlet, Rexworthy, Sampford Arundel, Shearson, Shipham, Standerwick, Stockland, Stoke Pero, Stone, Stringston, Sutton Mallet, Swang, Thorne St.Margeret, Tolland, Vexford, Weacombe, White Oxmead, Witham Friary, Withiel, Woolston(Stogursey) 1

5 Oxmead, Witham Friary, Withiel, Woolston(Stogursey) Count of Mortain Alford, Appley, Ashbrittle, Ashill, Athelney, Babcary, Barrow, Beercocombe, Bickenhall, Bradford, Bradon, Broadway, Brushford, Charlton Adam, Chelvey, Chilthorn, Chinnock, Chiselborough, Clapton, Clapton(Cucklington), Clevedon, Cloford, Closworth, Clutton, Cricket Malherbie, Cricket St Thomas, Crowcombe, Cucklington, Donyatt, Easthams, Eckweek, Foddington, Ford, Greenham, Hatch Beaychamp, Hele, Houndstone, Isle Brewers, Keinton Mandeville, Kingstone, Lopen, Lufton, Marston Magna, Merriott, Milton Clevedon, Montacute (Castle and chief Domain), North Perrott, Norton FitzWarren, Norton sub Hamdon, Odcombe, Pendomer, Preston, Redlynch, Shepton Beauchamp, Shepton Montague, Sock Dennis, Staple Fitzpaine, Steart, Stoke Trister, Stoney Stoke, Sutton Montis, Swell, Thorne, Thornfalcon, Thurlbear, Tintinhull, Weston Bampfylde, Whitestaunton, Woolston(South Cadbury), Yeovil, Roger Arundel Ash Priors, Beckington, Berkley, Charlton Mackrel, Cheddon Fitzpaine, Cudworth, Durston, Fiddinton(2 Mills), Halse, Halswell, Huish Champflower, Kittisford, Lyde, Marston Bigot, Penselwood, Raddington, Sandford, Skilgate, Sutton Bingham, Sydenham, Timberscombe, Tuxwell, Upper Cheddon, Whitelackington, Walter de Douai, Allerton, Alstone, Alston Sutton, Ansford, Badgworth, Bathealton, Bawdrip, Bradney, Bratton Seymour, Brean, Bridgewater, Burnham on Sea, Castle Cary, Chilcompnton, Crook, Dunwear, Horsey, Huntspill, Pawlett, Sparkford, Strecholt, Tarnock, Walpole, Watchet, Weare, Wembdon, Wincanton, Worle, Alfred d Epaignes, Alfoxton, Dyche, East Bower, Goathurst, Hillfarance, Huntworth, Leigh, Luckington, Marsh Mills, Merridge, Nether Stowey, Plainsfield, Rodhuish, Spaxton, Stawley, Woolmersdon, Count Eustace. Belluton, Chelwood, Combwich, Compton Dando, Compton Durville, Loxton, Newton(North Peverton), Thurstan FitzRolph. Clapton(Maperton), Compton Pauncefoot, Dunkerton, Eastrip, Maperton, North Cadbury, Pitcombe,.South Cadbury, Syndercombe, Serlo de BurcyAldwick, Blagdon, Lovington, Moreton, Ridgehill,. Stone(Modford), Uphill, Wheathill, Compton Martin, William d Eu. Chilton Cantelo.Hinton Blewett, Hinton St. George, Laverton, Tickenham, Whatley(Winsham), Yoevilton. Ralph de Limesey Alier, Allerford, Bossington,Luccombe, Rapps, Selworthy, Treborough, Humphrey the Chamberlain. Claverton, Crandon, Holton, Lattiford, Lytes Cary, William de Falaise. Stogursey, Woodspring, Wootten Courtenay, Ansger Cook. Lilstock, Preston Plucknet, Shovel, Robert d Auberville. Melcombe, Wearne, Wellisford, Withypool, Geoffrey de Mowbray. Cameley, Elborough, Pitcott, Ralph de Pomeroy. Oare, Edmund FitzPayne. Walton(Kilmersdon) Baldwin the Sheriff of Devon.Hemington, Porlock, Richard de Les Andelys. Stogumber, Hugh d Avranches. Earl of Chester. Tetton, John the Usher. Hunstile,Wigborough, Robert FitzGerald. Charlton Musgrove, Ralph Pagnell. East Quantoxhead, Osborn Giffard. Elm, Woodborough, Drogo de Montacute. Knowle Park, William FitzGuy. Horsington, Arnulf de Hesdin. Rodden, Weston(Bath), William Hussey. Tadwick, Whatley(Frome) 2

6 Arnulf de Hesdin. Rodden, Weston(Bath), William Hussey. Tadwick, Whatley(Frome) Edward of Salisbury. Hinton Charterhouse, Gilbert Fitzthorold. Kewstoke, Ubley, Sheriff of Wiltshire. Norton St.Philip, Hugolin the Interpreter. Warleigh, Ralph de Mortimer. Walton(Gordano), The Churches of Somerset were abundantly endowed with holdings. Glastonbury Church Alhampton, Andersey, Batcombe, Blackford, Butleigh, Camerton, Catcott, Chilton Polden,Cossington, Croscombe, Dinnington, Ditcheat, Downhead, Durborough, East Brent, East Cranmore, Edington, Edingworth, Glastonbury, Greinton, Ham, Hornblotton, Kenton, Lamyatt, Marksbury, Meare, Mells, Middlezoy, North Wootton, Overleigh, Panborough, Pedwell, Pennard, Pilton, Podimore, Pylle, Shapwick, Shepton Mallet, Stawell, Walton(Glastonbury), Westcombe, West Cranmore, West Monkton, Winscombe, Woolavington, Wrington, Muchelney Church(St Peter s). Cathanger, Chipstable, Drayton, Ilminster, Isle Abbots, Midelney, Muchelney, Thorney, West Camel, Bath ChurchAshwick, Baltonsborough, Bathampton, Bathford, Charlcombe, Corston, Lyncombe, Monkton Combe, Priston, Stanton Prior, Wilmington, Athelney Church. Hamp, Ilton, Lyng, Seavington, The Bishopric were also endowed with many lands, but they were not necessarily resident in Somerset. Bishop of Coutances, Ashcombe, Babington, Backwell, Bishopsworth, Butcombe, Chaffcombe, Charlinch, Clapton(Gordano), Claverham, Clewer, Compton Dando, Culbone, Dowlish, East Harptree, Easton, Emborough, Englishcombe, Exton, Farmborough, Farrington Gurney, Ford, Foxcote, Freshford, Hallatrow, Hardington, Havyat, High Littleton, Hutton, Keystoke, Keyford, Keynsham, Kingston Seymour, Langridge, Long Ashton, Lullington, Midgell, Newton(St Lo), Norton Malreward, Orchardleigh, Portbury, Portishead, Radstock, Rode, Rodney Stoke, Saltford, Ston Easton, Stony Littleton, Stowell, Stratton on the Fosse, Swainswick, Tellisford, Timsbury, Twerton, Upper Noble, West Harptree, Weston(Gordano), Wilmersham, Winford, Winterhead, Withycombe, Woolley, Wraxall, Bishop of Wells, Barrow Gurney, Bathwick, Combe St Nicholas, Compton Dundon, Evercreech, Kingsbury, Limes, Litton, Wanstrow, Wedmore, Wellington, Wells, Wemberham, Westbury, Winsham, Wiveliscombe, Yatton, Bishop of Winchester. Bleadon, Leigh(Lydeard), Lydeard St Lawrence, Maidenbrook, Nynehead, Pitminster, Rimpton, Shopnoller, Stoke St.Mary, Taunton, Bishop Maurice of London. Ilchester, Bishop of Bayeux. Temple Combe, Original Saxon holders. Beere, Brockley, Buckland, Chard,Chew Magna, The King, Duke William of Normandy, retained much of the land. Axbridge, Bath, Batheaston, Brompton Regis, Bruton (6 mills, Bath), Buckland St.Mary, Burnett, Cannington, Capland, Capton, Carhampton, Cheddar (2 Mills), Chew Stoke, Chewton Mendip, Coker, Combe Hay, Congresbury, Corton Denham, Creech St.Michael, Crewkerne, Curry Rivel, Discove, Didington, Draycott, Dulverton, Frome, Hardington Mandeville, Haselbury Plucknet, Hawkwell, Henstridge, Kilmersdon, Langford Budville, Langport, Martock, Milborne Port, Milton(Weston-super-Mare), Milverton, Mudford, Nettlecombe, North Curry, North Petherton, Oakley, Old Cleeve, Over Stratton, Pitney, Queen Camel, Somerton, South Petherton, Stanton Drew, West Lydford, Westowe, Whitcombe, Williton, Winsford, Writhlington. Barons, Bishops and Churches were essentially the main receivers of the King s favours. Little of the land 3

7 Barons, Bishops and Churches were essentially the main receivers of the King s favours. Little of the land was left under Saxon control, as you will note above. The King retained valuable lots, particularly those with strategic locations. His under-tenants ranked almost as highly as tenants-in-chief and included many highly placed Norman magnates with holdings in other counties. Chief tenants in Somerset were also under-tenants to fellow Norman nobles, both in Somerset and in other counties, sometimes distant counties, such as Serlo de Burcy who held many many lordships in Cheshire to the north. Although the distribution seems on the surface to be relatively mindless, each county in England and Wales followed the same pattern. We can conjecture it was planned with much forethought and experience. Obviously, King Edward the Confessor s existing tax rolls were used as a base for most of the grants, and an approximate estimate of their net worth. The alternative to this complex cross-weave pattern of holdings between chief-tenant, under-tenant and the King, was to allocate geographic parcels of land absolute, becoming a territory, thereby allowing small enclaves of power to grow and develop much like the petty Kings of Ireland. This experience was not what Duke William had in mind. Whether there had been collusion between Edward the Confessor and William during his thirty year stay in friendly exile at the Norman court can only be a point of conjecture. The huge problem of continuance of administration between the two monarchs was immense. The distribution of the lands throughout England and Wales was apparently finalized before 1068, although the Domesday Survey did not take place until And the mechanism of the collection of taxes proceeded in a relative orderly manner. Residency was not the key to the administrative problem. Many of the holders of the lands in Somerset, for instance, were either absent in other counties where they held their chief domainit is unlikely that large magnates ever got to see their specific holdings more than once or twice in their whole lifetime. There were many other events in history developing between Source 1996 Hall of Names International Inc. Tel (613) Fax (613) s Doomsday Book References to Goathurst and Halwell, 1086 There were originally two separate Manors here - the village of Goathurst and Haslwell, now Halswell House. Goathurst "Walter and Ansger the cook (coquus) hold Alfred de Ispania - Gahers. Alwo held it in the time of King Edward and paid geld for three hides less one virgate of land. There is six arable for six ox-teams. In the desmene there are two ox-teams and four serfs, thirteen villeins, five cottars and four ploughs. There are sixty-two acres of woodland. When he received it it was worth seventy shillings. Now the same." The 1166 survey states "Hugh, son of Malger of Gaherste, held one knights fee of Phillip de Colombar" (Lord of Stowey). In 1284 "Roger of Gatherst held the vill of John de Colombar." In 1346 Roger had been succeeded by his son Walter and by 1400 the Pawletts held most of the manor of Goathurst. Halswell "Wido holds of Roger Arundell - Halswell. Alward held it in the time of King Edward and paid geld of one hide. There is arable for two ox-teams. In the desmene ther is one ox-team and two serfs, two villeins, three cottars with one plough. There are fourteen acres of woodland. It is worth twenty-five shillings." Source 4

8 Notes on St Edward's Church, Goathurst by RD Ansdell Blackmore Farm Occupied by Mr and Mrs I Dyer in Blackmore Farm near Cannington, Bridgwater, Somerset TA5 2NE is a working farm, which was once part of the Halswell estate (sold in the 1950s (1978?)to a Trades Union Pension fund and subsequently bought by the sitting tenant, Ken Dyer, in Ken Dyer's sons Ian and Alan now run the farm. Ian and his wife Ann live in the farm and also run it as a Bed and Breakfast. It has been carefully restored and is a Grade I Listed Building (ST23NW, 7/2, listed 29 March 1963). The Manor is mentioned in the Doomsday Survey of AD 1085 and is now recognised in it as the Blackmore of Cannington. It was spelt "Blachamore" in the Doomsday Book. The DB entry reads as follows "Anschitil holds of Roger de Courcelle, Blachamore. Aluric held it in the time of Edward (i.e Edward the Confessor, the last of the Saxon Kings), and paid a geld (a tax) for 1 virgate of land. To this manor has been added one acre of land which in the time of King Edward thegn held in parage. There are two bordars. The whole was and is worth eight shillings." This indicates an estate of between one and two hundred acres. There were two cottages. Parage was usually a marriage settlement. Note Cannington was held by William of Normandy (the King) according to the DB. How Roger de Courcelle held Blackmore is not explained. It is not known who held the manor after Roger de Courcelle, but in the 14th Century it was owned by a family called Tresseleven ( the name has various spellings Trevellion. Treveleyan) This family had lands in Somerset for hundreds of years. The following appears in the Assize Rolls. " In 1382 one Thomas Hatswell of Halsfield, of Minehead in conjunction with Sir Baldwin Malet, Knight of Enmore, was indicted for entering the house of one Richard Tresseleven at Blackmore in Cannington Parish, and of carrying off his wife Margaret, and various other goods and chattels, that is to say, cloth, flax,wool, a silver cup, some silver spoons and some money. Sir Baldwin and Hatswell replied that at the time of the action Margaret was not the wife of the complainant." No result of the action is recorded. Note Could Thomas Hatswell of Halsfield have been a Halswell? The Malet family have held land in Somerset since then and still do. By the 15th Century the house was in the hands of the Tremayle family, who may have built the present structure circa They came from Sidbury in Devon. The Tremayles came because one of them married Margaret, whose sister, Joan was married to Roger Pym of Brymore, Cannington. From the Tremayles the manor descended to the Halswells by the marriage of Nicholas Halswell with Margaret, daughter and heiress of John Tremayle, son of the supposed builder. Of interest is a will of Thomas Tremayle of Blackmore,

9 "I will that the day of my burial shall be solemly kept with a song or dirge, with these three Masses following one of the Blessed Lady, the other of the Trinity and the third of Requiem. 20 shillings to be given to the same day to the poor to pray for me. To the Prioress of the Convent of Cannington for tythes forgotton, 20 shillings. Margery my daughter, the wife of Nicholas Halswell, my best coverlet havings a story of Sampson on him. To the same, all my goods in the manor of Halswell. To John Halswell son of the same Nicholas, one mare of sorrel colour with her colt, or 20 shillings of money. Every Godchild in the Parish of Cannington, four pence. The Vicar, three shillings and four pence." From Margaret it came to Rober Halswell, as is found in a will of 1564, which reads " Margery my wife to assign the Manors of Blackmore and the lands in Cannington to Robert Halswell, my son and heir." Robert lived at Halswell House. In 1570 Robert Halswell's will contained the following "To Nicholas my son, my great chain of gold and my plate except one little gilt goblet. Susan my wife to have the custody of the plate so long as she continuues a widow. She is also to have the little gilt goblet and all the residue of my goods." Then follows a reference to his coffers which read "Three locks with keys to be set on my coffer of Evidences, now in the Parlour; one key to remain with my executrix (his wife) and others with my cousin, Hugh Brook and with my friend Henry Portman. The coffer to stand in the house of Blackmore." The will finishes by leaving all his armour to Nicholas Halswell. Somewhere about 1600 the manor seems to have turned into just a farm. It pasesd to the Tyntes, along with Halswell, through the marriage of Jane, only child of Hugh Halswell to John Tynte. Their only son, Sir Halswell Tynte succeeded to the estate in He became a baronet in 1674 (72?). Notes on the Barony of Wharton Phillip, Baron Wharton was Speaker of the House of Commons from 1642 to Sir Thomas Wharton was Controller of the Household of William of Orange. His son was outlawed in 1729 for High Treason. (This was rescinded in 1845 as an error!.) He died in 1729 and the Barony and his estates fell to his sisters. The title fell into disuse until it was reclaimed in Source for notes on Blackmore and Whartons is the Revd AR Moss as printed in notes for Blackmore Farm by Mr and Mrs Ian Dyer

10 THE GARDEN & PARK AT HALSWELL HOUSE. SOMERSET A Lecture to the Somerset Building Preservation Trust. 21st October 1994 by John Neale, Secretary of the Georgian Group 1. Introduction The ruined and decaying garden buildings which stand today in farmland around Halswell House are the remnant of what was among the finest eighteenth century landscapes in the South-West. In the laying out of the park and pleasure grounds, in the exploitation of the topography of the site, and in the variety of the buildings and structures which adorned it, Halswell was an exemplar of mid-georgian landscape design. 2. History of the Family & House Halswell passed to the Tynte family through the marriage of Jane Halswell to John Tynte in the mid-seventeenth century. Their son, Sir Halswell Tynte, the first baronet, built the present north or principal wing of the house, which bears the inscribed date 1684, retaining parts of the earlier house behind it. There is evidence to suggest that the architect of this accomplished house was a little known London surveyor called William Taylor. Described by Pevsner as "the finest house of its date in the county", the building is a refined and carefully detailed design, whose emphasis is upon the rich and complex setting which surrounds the entrance and central window above it. The eighteenth century landscape at Halswell was the creation of Sir Charles Kemeys Tynte, who became the fifth baronet in 1740 following the deaths of his two elder brothers. (His portrait can be seen on his fine Neo-Classical monument in the church at Goathurst, designed by Nollekens.) During the 45 years he owned the estate Tynte transformed the garden and park, removing the formal garden shown in an early C18 painting in front of the house - with its terraces, symmetrical lawns, fountain and brick gazebo - naturalising the landscape and adorning it with picturesque structures. 3. Mid-Georgian Gardens In doing so Tynte was entirely in the spirit of the times. His landscape at Halswell reflected various of the central preoccupations of mid-eighteenth century landscape designers e.g. the relation between Nature and art in the laying out of gardens, the of buildings and other ornament to make sentimental mythological or other allusions. The relation between Art and Nature was a continuing theme in discussions of garden design throughout the eighteenth century. The 1720s and '30s saw formal gardens eclipsed as various critics attacked their artificiality and urged that closer attention be paid to Nature. Pope expressed this in his Epistle to Lord Burlington (1731). To build, to plant, whatever you intend, To rear the Column, or the Arch to bend, To swell the Terras, or to sink the Grot; In all let Nature never be forgot although, as this extract makes clear, deference to Nature did not imply that art should be forsaken. William Kent, Lord Burlington's protege, put it into practice. This marked the beginnings of the Natural Style. From then on formality was let go, the clipping of hedges and avenues was abandoned, canals were transformed into lakes, the appearance of gardens were softened. This tendency was to lead to the sometimes almost abstract landscapes created by Capability Brown from the 1750s, but much mid-eighteenth century gardening was increasingly natural in its landscaping and planting while preserving other aspects of the early eighteenth century approach to gardens, as was the case at Halswell, The use of buildings, ornament and scenery for associational purposes was one of these. This was particularly practised at Stowe, where, e.g., the Temple of British Worthies honoured famous Britons, while a satiric contrast was presented between the Temple of Ancient Virtues, a beautiful classical rotunda, and that of Modern Virtue, a ruin constructed by Rent with trees growing from its roof. Less elaborate imagery to commemorate friendships, evoke classical legends or English history or celebrate the 7

11 commemorate friendships, evoke classical legends or English history or celebrate the English countryside, were ubiquitous. Each of these can be found at Halswell, as well as references to the Old Testament and to druids. The habit of looking at landscape through the analogy of pictures was another theme of eighteenth century writing about gardens, and is reflected in a contemporary description of Halswell which I shall mention later; but it is also interesting to note that Tynte's friend, adviser and neighbour Copplestone Warre Bampfylde was a well known landscape painter, some of whose views of Stourhead are preserved there, Early examples of the Natural Style can be seen at Rousham, Oxfordshire, where an earlier formal layout was naturalised between 1738 & 1741by William Rent. In the 1730s Rent also worked with Lord Cobham to create an irregular or Natural extension to the famous formal garden at Stowe, laid out earlier in the century by Charles Bridgeman. This was the so called Elysian Fields, which were created in an irregular valley with buildings irregularly disposed, serpentine bodies of water and loosely planted groves. The serpentine came to be considered as the characteristic expression of natural form - whether in the design of water or in the disposition of walks; and the improvement of one's grounds in the natural taste became de rigeur, as the Gentleman's Magazine reported in "Every man now, be his fortune what he will, is to be doing something at his Place. One Large Room, a Serpentine River, and a Wood are become the most absolute necessaries of life". Among Sir Charles Tynte's friends and correspondents were several such improvers, e.g. John Aislabie of Studley Royal in Yorkshire and Valentine Morris of Piercefield, Monmouthshire, one of the first to value the dramatic natural scenery of the Wye Valley. Nearer to home were Copplestone Warre Bampfylde of Hestercombe and Henry Hoare of Stourhead. The eighteenth century garden at Hestercombe has been lost, but Bampfylde helped Hoare in the design of the garden at Stourhead, which was and continues to be one of the most celebrated eighteenth century gardens, as he did Tynte in that of Halswell. Hoare's transformation of the valley near his Palladian villa from the 1740s coincided with Tynte's improvements at Halswell. Hoare's initial conception as a classical landscape illustrating scenes from the Aeniad broadened as the allusions in the garden became more diverse, and the ambitious architectural ornaments - such as the Pantheon (1753) and the Temple of Apollo (1765) - came to be built above all for their picturesque qualities. 4. The Creation of the Landscape at Halswell Sir Charles Tynte's works at Halswell can be summarised for convenience as affecting three discrete aspects of the garden and park first, the immediate setting of the house, where the formal garden was removed and the ground naturalised; second, the Pleasure Grounds in Mill Wood, which were planted and embellished with new structures; third, the wider park, which was extended and planted. A memorandum in the SCRO written in 1781 by Sir Charles's steward, Richard Escott, provides an invaluable account of Tynte's improvements. Work had begun before Escott's appointment in A painting of c shows the formal garden and terraces of the earlier view removed the brick gazebo survives above lawns which fall to a small lake. The removal of the unfashionable formal garden was thus the first priority; but the avenues to the west of the house were retained and were shown on the 1756 survey and indeed are also present on the nineteenth century OS map, although now lost. The stepped pyramid above the spring, dedicated to "a pure nymph", may also date from before 1753 as there is no reference to it in Escott's memorandum (although as it is not mentioned in later accounts of the garden it might be a later structure). The pyramid, if built in the mid- C18, predates the later Egyptian taste. Its source is rather the earlier eighteenth century pyramids by Vanbrugh at Stowe and Castle Howard, which derive from the Pyramid of Gaius Cestius at Rome. At the time of Escott's appointment Tynte was altering Halswell House itself. Various internal alterations were carried out between 1753 and 1763, and in 1764 the Blandford architect Francis Cartwright remodelled the side elevations. Curiously Cartwright's is the only architect's name to appear in Escott's memorandum. In the same year a rockwork screen at the head of the canal on the lawn was constructed. This no longer survives, unless it is the screen below the canal, now too overgrown to photograph. The next two years were equally active. In 1755 the Bridge in the Wood and Mrs Busby's Temple on the Lawn - the Rotunda - were built and in 1756 the Druid's Temple 8

12 Busby's Temple on the Lawn - the Rotunda - were built and in 1756 the Druid's Temple followed. These buildings, and the rockwork screen, have been attributed by Gervase Jackson-Stops to Thomas Wright. Called by contemporaries the Wizard of Durham, Wright was a man of humble origins who was taken up by a wide circle of aristocrats first for his skill as an astronomer and subsequently as an architect and gardener. The resemblance of some involvement on Wright's part. If so he may also have designed the rotunda, as he built rotundas elsewhere. Escott's memorandum does not account for the series of cascades and associated structures in Mill Wood, of which the Bridge was only one. At the top of the wood (that is at its southern end) the stream sprang from three large apsidal rockwork niches. Here a tablet celebrated Nature's gifts in pastoral verse, recalling the ingratitude of Israel after Moses made water flow in the desert and exhorting Ye happy swains for whom these waters flow, Oh may your hearts with grateful ardours glow. and going on to celebrate the surrounding countryside Lo! here a fountain streams at his command, Not o'er a barren but a fruitful land, Where Nature's choicest gifts the valley's fill, And smiling plenty gladdens every hill! - sentiments inscribed for the appreciation of Tynte and his friends rather than for the edification of passing swains. Below the spring were five small lakes, the first terminating with the Bridge in the Wood, the second with a huge rockwork arch, beneath which stood a large statue of Neptune, and all ending in rockwork cascades. Sequences of informal rockwork cascades had already been used by Kent at Rousham and Stowe, and were a feature of Bampfylde's garden at Hestercombe. It is not clear whether the lakes and planting in Mill Wood which formed the principle pleasure ground although occupying the combe falling from the Quantocks to the west of the house had already been laid out before Sir Charles' time or were his addition to the park. Their origin, as was so often the case with decorative waters in the eighteenth century, was industrial, as the stream in the combe had been a mill race. If Sir Charles did lay out this part of the garden Escott's omission might be accounted for were the work largely completed before his appointment. A lull in building in the park followed - although work in the house went on until the flooring of the hall in But improvement to the garden and park continued. Escott records that the park was enlarged in 1761 and planting was carried out in the lower and eastern part of Mill Wood in the following year. In 1764 the thicket at the eastern head of the park was planted - this appears to refer to an addition to the wood at the top of the hill above the house - and sunk fences were being created. In the same year building in the park resumed with the construction of the Temple of Harmony. The Temple is the most distinguished of the garden buildings at Halswell. Its architect was Thomas Prowse, a talented example of an especially Georgian phenomenon, the amateur architect. A gentleman, M.P. for Somerset for 27 years, he was a member of that circle which included Sanderson Miller, the Warwickshire Gothic revivalist, and John Chute, the designer of part of Horace Walpole's pioneering Gothic house, Strawberry Hill and of the magnificent Roman staircase in his own house, the Vyne, in Hampshire. Prowse helped Miller with the design of Hagley Hall, a very grand Palladian house in Worcestershire; and his own design for the more modest Hatch Court, Hatch Beauchamp, is a more subtle and architecturally satisfying variant of the same theme, that of the Palladian house with corner towers. There are stylistic and circumstantial reasons for supposing that Prowse was also the architect of the church at Berkeley which is notable for its use of a central plan derived from Wren, as well as for the stucco decoration of the octagonal dome. The design of the Temple of Harmony is derived from the drawings of the Temple of Fortuna Virilis in Rome given in the fourth of Palladio's Four Books of Architecture, the English editions of which were the authoritative texts for the Palladian movement which dominated English architecture from the 1730s to the 1760s. Lord Burlington, the champion of Palladian architecture, bad been the first person to attempt an archaeologically inspired recreation of an antique building in the York Assembly Rooms; but although thirty years later it was not rare to "recreate antiquity" in this manner the exercise remained an unusual one. Robert Adam provided a design for the end wall of 9

13 exercise remained an unusual one. Robert Adam provided a design for the end wall of the interior. It was both an appropriate and a curious choice that this Neo-Classical architect should be asked to design an interior for the little Roman temple astray in Somerset and designed by a Palladian amateur, as one of Adam's claims to authority made against his Palladian elders, was his own study of Roman remains unmediated by such renaissance interpreters as Palladio. But Adam's design was only partially executed. The niche and Palmyran capitals are his, but his panels of arabesque plasterwork were omitted. We know that Prowse sent drawings to the Bristol stuccoist, Thomas Stocking, and the work as executed is in his own Rococo manner, more robust and florid, and less classical, than Adam's taste. The Temple was to be a memorial to Peregrine Palmer, a friend of both Tynte and Prowse; following Prowse's own death in 1767 he too was commemorated there. The construction of the Temple of Harmony in 1764 was the final architectural embellishment of the pleasure grounds in Mill Wood, although planting appears to have continued. Two years later firs were planted behind the temple to complete its setting, part of a campaign of planting recorded by Escott, who mentioned fir and chestnut as the species used. Robin Hood's Hut was built a year after the Temple of Harmony. The 1756 survey of the park shows the plantations on this hill already crossed by walks or rides, and by 1764 Tynte bad already added to these woods. Robin Hood's Hut served both as an eyecatcher and as a shelter from which to enjoy the spectacular view from the Quantocks across the country to the Bristol Channel and Wales beyond. The fragment of a vine leaf frieze which survives in the oval loggia reflects its other use, as an eating pavilion. In style and meaning the two buildings were very different. The Temple of Harmony was a reconstruction of an ancient temple dedicated to an antique virtue and to friendship. Robin Hood's Hut was Gothic and commemorated a national legend who may have been seen as a hero of English liberty. With this Gothic addition to the classical Rotunda and Temple, the rustic Druid's Temple, and the rockwork screens and cascades, Halswell exhibited the almost the full eclecticism of mid-georgian taste. All that was missing was something oriental, a Chinese tea house as at Stowe, a pagoda such as that at Shugborough, which Thomas Wright may have designed, or even a Turkish Tent such as that recently built at Painshill, Surrey, where Charles Hamilton was creating another amateur landscape garden - the current restoration of which can be seen as an encouraging omen for Halswell. The imagery of Robin Hood's Hut can be compared to that of Alfred's Tower at Stourhead. As it was thought a native style, the use of Gothic was appropriate for the evocation of the tradition of national liberty, to which King Alfred and Robin Hood were conscripted. Gothic had been used for garden buildings from the early eighteenth century, for example by Vanbrugh for the mock fortifications of Castle Howard, and in Miller's hands Gothic garden building became a significant testing ground for the Gothic revival. The loggia at the end of the canal at Shotover, near Oxford, built in the 1720s and probably designed by Kent, was among the earliest garden buildings to use Gothic detail in the playful and wholly unarchaeological way which a popular alternative to "correct" classicism in the mid-eighteenth century especially for garden architecture. Robin Hood's Hut belongs more to this tradition than to the developing interest in archaeologically inspired Gothic building. The re-erection of the Bristol High Cross at Stourhead in 1765 illustrates another strand to the Gothic building of the period, the use of genuine medieval fabric or whole structures, and the gothic ruin at Crowcombe Court, not far from Halswell, incorporates medieval fabric from Halsway Manor. A drawing for a Gothic pavilion inscribed for "Sir Charles Kemeys...Halswell" survives among a set of designs by Henry Keene at the V & A, and the Hut as built seems to have been a variant of this design. The triple ogee arches supported on clustered columns, which created an open room in place of the closed octagon in the design, are feature used by Keene elsewhere, e.g. at the Enville Museum in Staffordshire. On the basis of stylistic affinities between the cornice in the Tynte pew in Goathurst church and Keene's other work it has been suggested that he may have refitted the pew, another of Sir Charles' architectural projects. (It is interesting to note, for the light it casts of the priorities of the time, that only in this year, 1765, was the "great sewer" built to take sewage away from the house. Prior to this it appears to have drained into the canal beside the house, which may have been an object of beauty and an embellishment of the grounds but presumably - at least at times - 10

14 object of beauty and an embellishment of the grounds but presumably - at least at times - smelt noxious until the sewer's construction.) The last important building erected by Tynte was the so-called Temple of Pan, constructed in This was a brick house for his bailiff with a pedimented front (oddly facing almost into a hill) and a simple convex Doric portico behind which the wall was concave so as top form an oval loggia, (In plan the loggia repeats that of Robin Hood's Hut.) A statue of Pan formerly stood some way in front of the house. This structure was almost certainly designed by John Johnson, who exhibited a design for a "Temple of Pan in the Gardens of Sir Charles Kemeys...at Halswell" in 1778, and if so the handsome arcaded wall to the rear of the main house, which Escott records as built in 1770, can also be safely attributed to him. The final reference in Escott's record is to some waterworks carried out in 1781, perhaps those which Bampfylde referred to in a letter the following year, praising the new "lower piece of water" but criticising the upper one, whose contrast with the former he thought would "ever be an impediment to the natural appearance of that scene". In Collinson's History of Somerset is an illustration of Halswell made before 1791 which does something to show the appearance of the park after Tynte's improvements. But my account, illustrated only with photographs of the scene as it is today, can give only a shadowy picture of what the park and garden were like in the eighteenth century. Fortunately a comprehensive account written by Arthur Young and published in 1771, ~ Tour Through the West of England, survives and is worth quoting at some length in conclusion as a record of how a contemporary experienced the site. "the riding which leads from the house to the principal points of view crosses the park... It runs by a woody precipice and up through some new plantations, from a dark part of which you enter.., into a temple dedicated to Robin Hood, upon which the most noble prospect breaks at once upon the beholder, which acts not a little by the surprise of the entrance." After describing the view he goes on, westwards. "Here the grounds sinking from the eye command a most sweet landscape. The lawns undulate in the finest manner.., the clumps and scattered trees have an uncommon elegance and unite the foreground of the scene with Robin Hood's Temple, which is here seen to great advantage" - a description of the scene in the way one might describe a painting. Then he descends the hill to the "wild and sequestered spot" where the spring rises. A little further on, into Mill Wood, "you catch a bridge, under a thick shade, and then come to the Druid's Temple, built in a just style of bark etc, the view gloomy and confined; the water winds silently along, except a little gushing fall, which hurts not the emotion raised by such a sequestered scene." There is something a little incongruous and incredible about the juxtaposed reactions of the connoisseur appreciating the supposedly barbaric and primitive structure of the Druid's Temple as a "just" piece of work and the man of feeling responding emotionally to the scene as intended. He goes on through Mill Wood until "A break in the trees to the right lets in a view of the Rotunda. Passing to the Ionic portico (the Temple of Harmony)... the scenery in view is truly enchanting. The lawn is gently waved and spotted with trees and shrubs in the happiest taste. The water seems to wind naturally through a falling vale; and a swelling hill crowned by the Rotunda forms a complete picture, The whole scene is really elegant every part is riant and bears the stamp of pleasure". The path then returns Young to woods and further cascades, which he criticises as repetitious. But his mood changes again as the shady wood provides "a fit residence for contemplation to dwell in...the awful shade, the solemn stillness of the scene impress upon the mind a melancholy scarcely effaced by the view of a rich vale. He is able again to feel an emotion appropriate to the design white acknowledging the limits to the illusion it creates. There appears to have been little further development to the gardens and park - although the early nineteenth century lodge perhaps deserves a mention - a thatched cottage with a rustic timber verandah floored with pebbles. The appropriate closing words can therefore be Young's "This seat has received rich gifts from Nature, and very pleasing ones from Art". Reproduced with John Neale's kind permission 8 Jun 98 11

15 A Little Light History There were already two manors in Goathurst before the Norman Conquest in 1066 Halswell was occupied by Alweard and in 1086 Wido held it of Roger of Arundel. By 1280 when Peter of Halswell successfully claimed his inheritance and held the manor for ¼ knight s fee, the family was identified by its landholding and appears to have the manor in direct descent until the mid 17th century. The earliest reference to the house is in 1318 when licence was granted by the bishop to William Halswell for masses to be said in a private chapel there. Sadly, little is known of the family in the 15th century. The family rose to greater prominence in the 16th century. Nicholas Halswell, a lawyer involved in the sale of former monastic lands and MP for Bridgwater undertook building work at the house in On his death in 1564 it passed from his son Robert (d 1570) to his grandson, another Nicholas, then a minor. In later life he was knighted and appears to have undertaken building work between 1595 and 1610 as he was paying dues on lias, freestone and tile being brought by sea through Bridgwater. After the death of Sir Nicholas in 1633 the manor was inherited in turn by his two surviving sons Henry then Hugh a clergyman, who settled in on his only daughter Jane. Through her marriage c the house passed into the ownership of the Tynte family where it remained until Her husband John Tynte was a colonel in the Royalist army during the civil war and in July 1645 some 40 cavaliers, their servants and over a hundred horses were quartered at Halswell. In 1667 the manor was settled on their son Halswell Tynte, later Sheriff of the county and MP for Bridgwater, who was created a baronet in 1674 in recognition of his father s services to the crown. The size of the house he inherited is indicated by the hearth tax of 1664, when there were 17 hearths. As a reflection of his new-found status Sir Halswell had the north range (aka The Mansion House) rebuilt. There are no surviving documentary references to this but the building itself has a date stone of 1689 above the pediment on the north front. It was built in an imposing metropolitan style with recognizable influences stretching back to Palladio and developing through Inigo Jones and Christopher Wren with more than a passing nod to French pattern books of the day. The architect is thought to be William Taylor a London surveyor who visited Somerset in 1683 and also made alterations to Longleat. A formal garden was laid out north of the new range at much the same time. Sir Halswell died in 1702 and was succeeded by his son John who married the heiress to Kemeys family estates in Glamorgan. After his death in 1710 the manor was held in turn by his three sons, two of whom died young (in 1730 and 1740). However his third son Sir Charles Kemeys-Tynte lived at Halswell for 45 years and his widow held the estate in dower until Documentary evidence for the house in the 18th century is much more detailed. There is an account of the drains around the house dated 1724 and an inventory of 1730 detailing the contents of 63 rooms. From the time of Sir Charles there are household and estate accounts, diaries and letters, and an inventory taken on his death in He made a 12

16 accounts, diaries and letters, and an inventory taken on his death in He made a number of alterations to the house; principal of these was the redesign of the west elevation and the addition of the adjoining screen by Francis Cartwright of Blandford probably in A brick staircase was built in the courtyard and in 1771 a servant s hall. Amongst other internal improvements bookcases and a chimney piece were installed in the library and the first floor rooms in the east range were re-windowed and fitted out with panelling. The 1785 inventory lists 71 rooms and their contents (fourteen of these are in outbuildings), apparently starting on the top floor of the north wing; some rooms such as the Alcove Room have retained their names. However, Sir Charles principal interest lay in redesigning the ground as a romantic landscape with an array of garden buildings in an eclectic mixture of styles. Collinson in History (1791, 81-3) states that "what chiefly attracts the notice and attention of strangers are the decorated grounds" and quotes an extended description, illustrated by an engraving of the park with a distant view of the house from the north-east. This differs only in detail from an oil painting of 1764 by John Inigo Richards. More functionally exotics such as citrus fruit, coffee trees and melons were cultivated in the hothouses. After the death of Lady Tynte in 1798 the house passed to a niece Jane Hassell, married to Colonel Johnson, who took the name Kemeys-Tynte and thereafter it was passed through the family in direct succession. Efforts were made to revive the title Baron Wharton and this was successful in However the house was only used intermittently throughout the 19th century and no structural work of any consequence appears to have taken place. It featured in Country Life in 1908 and the accompanying photographs provide a valuable record of the pre-fire interiors. Fire broke out on 27th October 1923 and gutted the north range. Pictures and furniture were rescued but the fire brigade from Glastonbury had to break their way down through the double doors from roof level and part of the west wall subsequently collapsed. The cause of the outbreak was traced to recently-installed electrical wiring. Although the estate was now heavily mortgaged the house was restored at an estimated cost of 41, s by J Long of Bath under the direction of George and T S Vickery of London, who produced a set of large scale plans (1/4" to 1 ; 148) copies of which, mounted on boards, are still in existence. Restoration work took place between 1924 and 1926, commemorated on a plaque in the east elevation, and the damaged interiors were replicated to a very high standard. Work also took place on the older ranges; roofs and chimneys were renewed, small extensions were built and sash windows were replaced with mullions. During the Second World War the house was occupied briefly by St Hilda s School for Girls and subsequently by the armed forces; a Prisoner of War camp was established in the grounds. Lady Wharton died in 1944, the contents were sold in 1948 and the house in 1950 to Clarence Harris who converted it into 16 flats and a furniture repository. It was sold in 1985 and then again in 1993, the buyer being Park Investments. Dunster purchased Halswell in 2004 and the house you see now is the result of a comprehensive restoration programme. Copied from the web July 2009 http// 13

17 Current Situation as at October 2014 Park Investments, Dunster purchased Halswell in Later the house and gardens went into receivership and began to decay. However in 2013 the house was purchased by Edward Strachen, who immediately begain extensive restoration. In 2014 he also purchased more of the Great Park including Mill Wood. Restoration of these began in At the time of writing the house and gardens are starting a new renaissance. The Halswell Park Trust continues to advise and assist the new owner, especially in enabling access to the public and its education, which is part of its charitable object. Further details can be found on the Trust's website at 14

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64 Notes on Roger Halswell's Descendants Generation 1 1. RICHARD 1 HALSWELL. He married (1) CATHERINE DE GATCOMBE. She was born in She died in Generation 2 Notes for Catherine de Gatcombe: It maybe that this is in fact Catherine de Gatcombe (born) 1416 who married a Nicholas Halswell when she was 14 in This Catherine de Gatcombe was still alive in 1479 because a deed of that date, currently held by Charles Clarke of Gatcombe Court, refers to some land at Gatcombe Court in North Somerset saying "it was bounded by some land belonging to her". Catherine would then have been 63. On the other hand Catherine de Gatcombe might well have been the mother/aunt/cousin of this Robert Halswell. Research continues... Nov 2000 (Source Charles Clarke owner of Gatcombe Court letter dated 23 Nov 2000) Richard Halswell and Catherine de Gatcombe had the following child: 2. i. JOHN 2 HALSWELL. He married (1) MARY 'EST. 2. JOHN 2 HALSWELL (Richard 1 ). He married (1) MARY 'EST. Generation 3 John Halswell and Mary 'Est had the following child: 3. i. NICHOLAS 3 HALSWELL was born in He died in He married (1) MARGARY TREMAYLE. 3. NICHOLAS 3 HALSWELL (John 2, Richard 1 ) was born in He died in He married (1) MARGARY TREMAYLE. Notes for Nicholas Halswell: The estate called Halswell was first mentioned in 1086.(See Doomesday Book Notes) A house stood on it by 1318 which was rebuilt circa There was friction between the Halswell and Paulet families as to the title and use of the south aisle in Goathurst Church. In 1558, "by mediacion of friends" they signed an agreement which relinquished this aisle to the Paulets and gave Sir Nicholas Halswell a plot of ground, north of the Chancel, to build "an Ile of Chaell for himself and his heirs for ever." ( ie The Memorial Chapel) Notes for Margary Tremayle: By the 15th Century the Blackmore Manor in the Parish of Cannington was in the hands of the Tremayle family, who may have built the present Blackmore Farmhouse. They came from Sidbury in Devon. The Tremayles came because one of them married Margaret, whose sister, Joan was married to Roger Pym of Brymore, Cannington. From the Tremayles the manor descended to the Halswells by the marriage of Nicholas Halswell with Margaret, daughter and heiress of John Tremayle, son of the supposed builder. Of interest is a will of Thomas Tremayle of Blackmore, 1534: "I will that the day of my burial shall be solemly kept with a song or dirge, with these three Masses following: one of the Blessed Lady, the other of the Trinity and the third of Requiem. 20 shillings to be given to the same day to the poor to pray for me. To the Prioress of the Convent of Cannington 61

65 Generation 3 (con't) Generation 4 for tythes forgotton, 20 shillings. Margery my daughter, the wife of Nicholas Halswell, my best coverlet havings a story of Sampson on him. To the same, all my goods in the manor of Halswell. To John Halswell son of the same Nicholas, one mare of sorrel colour with her colt, or 20 shillings of money. Every Godchild in the Parish of Cannington, four pence. The Vicar, three shillings and four pence." From Margaret it came to Rober Halswell, as is found in a will of 1564, which reads: " Margery my wife to assign the Manors of Blackmore and the lands in Cannington to Robert Halswell, my son and heir." Robert lived at Halswell Nicholas Halswell and Margary Tremayle had the following children: 4. i. ROBERT 4 HALSWELL. He died on 11 Sep He married (1) SUSAN BROUNKER. ii. JOHN HALSWELL. Notes for John Halswell: John's existance is only known from an entry in his maternal grandfather's will in which he was left a sorrel mare and her colt and 20 shillings. His bierth and death date are not known. His brother inherited the estates. 4. ROBERT 4 HALSWELL (Nicholas 3, John 2, Richard 1 ). He died on 11 Sep He married (1) SUSAN BROUNKER. Generation 5 Notes for Robert Halswell: Robert lived at Halswell House. In 1570 Robert Halswell's will contained the following:: "To Nicholas my son, my great chain of gold and my plate except one little gilt goblet. Susan my wife to have the custody of the plate so long as she continuues a widow. She is also to have the little gilt goblet and all the residue of my goods." Then follows a reference to his coffers which read: "Three locks with keys to be set on my coffer of Evidences, now in the Parlour; one key to remain with my executrix (his wife) and others with my cousin, Hugh Brook and with my friend Henry Portman. The coffer to stand in the house of Blackmore." The will finishes by leaving all his armour to Nicholas Halswell. Robert Halswell and Susan Brounker had the following child: 5. i. NICHOLAS 5 HALSWELL was born about He died in 1633 in Bristol. He married Bridget Wallop, daughter of Henry Wallop, about She was born in She died in NICHOLAS 5 HALSWELL (Robert 4, Nicholas 3, John 2, Richard 1 ) was born about He died in 1633 in Bristol. He married Bridget Wallop, daughter of Henry Wallop, about She was born in She died in Notes for Nicholas Halswell: The magnificent effigy tomb (in St Edwards Church Chapel, Goathurst) was erected by their son 62

66 Generation 5 (con't) The magnificent effigy tomb (in St Edwards Church Chapel, Goathurst) was erected by their son Henry whose sister, Bridget, stated in her will "What would I not give that the bones of my faithful and dear Nicky were brought over and buried with me". He was also a JP and is recorded as having: "Committed to prison one John Gilbert alias Gogulmere, a fanatical minister, for having on a Sabbath day attempted to preach naked in the parish church of North Petherton." He sold Gatcombe Court to William Cox in 1623 having twice mortgaged it before doing so. This house had been part of the Halswell estate since 1430 when a Nicholas Halswell married Catherine de Gatcombe whose family had built Gatcombe Court in The Halswell family had by this time owned Gatcombe Court for 193 years. (Source Charles Clarke, current owner of Gatcombe Court 23 Nov 2000). Nicholas Halswell and Bridget Wallop had the following children: i. HENRY 6 HALSWELL was born about ii. HUGH HALSWELL was born in He died on 05 Jan He married (1) MILLICENT TEST. iii. BRIDGET HALSWELL. Notes for Bridget Halswell: The magnificent effigy tomb (in St Edwards Church Chapel, Goathurst) was erected by their son Henry whose sister, Bridget, stated in her will "What would I not give that the bones of my faithful and dear Nicky were brought over and buried with me". Nicky was her younger brother who died, age 32 in Bergen op Zoom in Holland. In her will she state " I leave to my cousin Wallop, my clocke, my little Paris worke, my Psalm book, my ring, on which is engraved - shall affliction part friends? - and I shall desire him to accept these as unworthy remembrances of an unfortunate wretch" iv. Her mother's maiden name was Wallop, so the cousin was, presumably, a maternal cousin. NICHOLAS HALSWELL. He died in Bergen op Zoom Holland. Generation 6 6. HUGH 6 HALSWELL (Nicholas 5, Robert 4, Nicholas 3, John 2, Richard 1 ) was born in He died on 05 Jan He married (1) MILLICENT TEST. Generation 7 Notes for Hugh Halswell: Was still living after his daughter Jane had married had borne her son (Halswell) and died. So he left Halswell house to his grandson (Halswell). Hugh Halswell and Millicent Test had the following child: 7. i. JANE 7 HALSWELL was born in She died on 07 Aug She met (1) JOHN TYNTE. He was born in 1618 in Chelvey, Nr Bristol. He died in JANE 7 HALSWELL (Hugh 6, Nicholas 5, Robert 4, Nicholas 3, John 2, Richard 1 ) was born in She died on 07 Aug She met (1) JOHN TYNTE. He was born in 1618 in Chelvey, Nr Bristol. He died in Notes for Jane Halswell: The parish notes record that she died in But as this is 2 years before she married and would have made her only 17 at the time of her death her birth, death and marriage dates need to be looked at further. 63

67 Generation 7 (con't) They had other children (details to be researched) these connections reach to Ireland, where there are other estates. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia ; Chelvey Court Chelvey Court is located in Somerset Chelvey Court Location of Chelvey Court in Somerset Location Chelvey, Brockley, Somerset, England Coordinates N WCoordinates: N W Built Listed Building - Grade II* Official name: Chelvey Court Designated 16 March 1984[1] Reference No Chelvey Court in the village of Chelvey near Brockley in the English county of Somerset was a large manor house built between 1618 and 1660 for Edward and John Tynte. It is a Grade II* listed building.[1] Edward Tynte, who was part of an important family in surrounding parishes and gave their name to Tyntesfield, bought the Lordship of the manor of Chelvey from John Aisshe.[2] Edward Tynte improved the St Bridgets Church, next to the manor house, which contains the Tynte chapel. His son John reconstructed the manor house with his wife Jane Halswell, of Halswell House. Their son Sir Halswell Tynte, 1st Baronet inherited both estates and developed Halswell House, leaving Chelvey Court to fall into decline.[2] Significant alterations were undertaken in 1805 which included demolition of the south part of the house and addition of buttresses.[1] The three storey house has been divided into two separate dwellings with a further two houses on the site which were adapted from buildings previously used for agricultural purposes.[3] South east of the house is a large 15th century barn, which was extended in the 19th century.[4] This is now used by a company restoring bedsteads. References[edit] 1.^ Jump up to: a b c "Chelvey Court and Bridge to the east and 2 Outbuildings to the south-west". National Heritage List for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 28 January ^ Jump up to: a b Knight, Norma. "A Short History of Chelvey" (PDF). Nailsea and District Local 64

68 Generation 7 (con't) 2.^ Jump up to: a b Knight, Norma. "A Short History of Chelvey" (PDF). Nailsea and District Local History Society. Retrieved 28 January Jump up ^ "Chelvey Court". Hallett-Pollard-Hilliar. Retrieved 28 January Jump up ^ "Barn, 50 yards south-east of Chelvey Court". National Heritage List for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 28 January Notes for John Tynte: Owned Chelvey Court manor House near Nailsea (can be seen from railway). Never owned Halswell house because he died before his father in law. The Tynte family had been distantly related to the Halswell family in the past. But this marriage was the one that first united the Halswell and Tynte families properly. Chelvey Court From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Chelvey Court Chelvey Court is located in Somerset Chelvey Court Location of Chelvey Court in Somerset Location Chelvey, Brockley, Somerset, England Coordinates N WCoordinates: N W Built Listed Building - Grade II* Official name: Chelvey Court Designated 16 March 1984[1] Reference No Chelvey Court in the village of Chelvey near Brockley in the English county of Somerset was a large manor house built between 1618 and 1660 for Edward and John Tynte. It is a Grade II* listed building.[1] Edward Tynte, who was part of an important family in surrounding parishes and gave their name to Tyntesfield, bought the Lordship of the manor of Chelvey from John Aisshe.[2] Edward Tynte improved the St Bridgets Church, next to the manor house, which contains the Tynte chapel. His son John reconstructed the manor house with his wife Jane Halswell, of Halswell House. Their son Sir Halswell Tynte, 1st Baronet inherited both estates and developed Halswell House, leaving Chelvey Court to fall into decline.[2] Significant alterations were undertaken in 1805 which included demolition of the south part of the house and addition of buttresses.[1] 65

69 Generation 7 (con't) The three storey house has been divided into two separate dwellings with a further two houses on the site which were adapted from buildings previously used for agricultural purposes.[3] South east of the house is a large 15th century barn, which was extended in the 19th century.[4] This is now used by a company restoring bedsteads. Generation 8 John Tynte and Jane Halswell had the following child: 8. i. HALSWELL 8 TYNTE was born in He died in He married Grace Fortescue, daughter of Robert Fortescue and Grace Granville, in She was born in 1649 in Castle Hill Filleigh Devon. She died in HALSWELL 8 TYNTE (Jane 7 Halswell, Hugh 6 Halswell, Nicholas 5 Halswell, Robert 4 Halswell, Nicholas 3 Halswell, John 2 Halswell, Richard 1 Halswell) was born in He died in He married Grace Fortescue, daughter of Robert Fortescue and Grace Granville, in She was born in 1649 in Castle Hill Filleigh Devon. She died in Generation 9 Notes for Halswell Tynte: In 1689 (the date carved above the central door case) Sir Halswell Tynte rebuilt the North range possibly using William Taylor as his surveyor. William Taylor came from London and also made alterations to Longleat and built the Minsterley church in Shropshire for the 1st Viscount Weymouth. At that date there was a formal garden of a large parterre with terraces and two brick pavilions. A fascinating picture showing the original formal garden a Halswell was sold from the house after WW II. Taken from the the north-east corner of the house it shows a substantial parterre with terraces and a square brick and stone pavilion with Goathurst church tower in the valley and an avenue leading down to the village on the extreme left. The panoramic treatment of the countryside beyond, with its jigsaw of fields and hedges suggests an artist such as John Griffier II. It is difficult to say whether Sir Halswell (died 1702) or his son, Sir John, who died in 1710 was responsible for the formal garden. Inherited Halswell Manor and built baroque front in 1689 from his Grandfather Rev Hugh Halswell The baroque monument (in the Chapel of Goathurst Church) to (or by) Sir Hugh and other members of his family has a long Latin inscription framed by Corinthian columns and flanked by figures of Faith and Hope. On either side of the cornice, cherubs show an hour glass and a skull. In the centre is the Halswell coat of arms, Per Pale, Barry Wavy, azure and argent. A bend gules. Argent, a bend very sable. Halswell Tynte and Grace Fortescue had the following child: 9. i. JOHN 9 TYNTE was born on 04 Mar He died on 05 Mar He met (1) JANE KEMEYS. She was born in She died in JOHN 9 TYNTE (Halswell 8, Jane 7 Halswell, Hugh 6 Halswell, Nicholas 5 Halswell, Robert 4 Halswell, Nicholas 3 Halswell, John 2 Halswell, Richard 1 Halswell) was born on 04 Mar He died on 05 Mar He met (1) JANE KEMEYS. She was born in She died in John Tynte and Jane Kemeys had the following children: 10. i. HALSWELL 10 TYNTE was born on 15 Nov He died on 12 Nov He married Mary Walters in She was born in Brecon. ii. JOHN TYNTE was born on 27 Mar He died on 15 Aug Notes for John Tynte: The monument in the Nave of St Edward's Church Goathurst was designed by JM 66

70 Generation 9 (con't) The monument in the Nave of St Edward's Church Goathurst was designed by JM Rysbrack ( ). It was erected by his brother Sir Charles Kemeys Tynte. 11. iii. JANE TYNTE was born on 27 Jul She died on 23 Jul She met (1) RUISHE HASSEL. He died on 06 Jun iv. CHARLES KEMEYS TYNTE was born on 19 May He died on 25 Aug He met (1) ANN BUSBY. She was born in She died on 24 Mar Notes for Charles Kemeys Tynte: KEMYS TYNTE, Sir Charles, 5th Bt. ( ), of Halswell, nr. Bridgwater, Som. and Cefn Mably, Glam. Constituency Dates MONMOUTH 14 Mar SOMERSET Family and Education b. 19 May 1710, 3rd s. of Sir John Tynte, 2nd Bt., M.P., by Jane, da. of Sir Charles Kemys, 3rd Bt., M.P., of Cefn Mably; bro. of Sir Halswell Tynte. m. 9 Mar. 1738, Anne, da. of Rev. Thomas Busby of Addington, Bucks., s.p. suc. uncle Sir Charles Kemys, 4th Bt., 1735 and took name of Kemys before Tynte; bro. as 5th Bt. 15 Aug Offices Held Steward of anniversary dinner of independent electors of Westminster Biography After contesting Glamorgan unsuccessfully in the Tory interest in January 1745, Tynte was brought in for Monmouth in March by the Duke of Beaufort. From 1747 he was returned for Somerset till he retired in The 2nd Lord Egmont in his electoral survey c describes him as having a very good interest at Bridgwater and (without management) will expect to be suffered to exert it for one Tory. He died 25 Apr Ref Volumes: Author: Romney R. Sedgwick The transformation of the landscape at Halswell was carried out from , and much of what we know about the alterations to the estate comes from a memorandum written by Richard Escott, the then estate steward. The earliest of the garden buildings is probably the Stepped Pyramid near the house which stands above the water cistern, built in the 1740s. But the first addition to the landscape was the Rock work Screen (Grotto) at the lower end of the lake near the house, with a round pond below, now ploughed over. In the Rotunda, the Bath Stone Bridge, the Druid's Temple (now lost) and the Grotto at the spring head were built. All these have close affinities to the work of Thomas Wright of Durham. By 1756, the ponds of Mill Wood had been completed and stocked with goldfish, trout and gudgeon, which attracted a constant stream of visitors. Besides the strange Herms on the Bath Stone Bridge, it is said that a statue of Neptune stood within a giant rusticated arch (only one side survives) with water gushing round its feet. In 1761 the park was extended to the east and soon afterwards the Temple of Harmony was started. Robin Hood's Hut, high above the house with magnificent views to the north was built in 1765 as a banqueting room. In 1765 a strange monument to a favourite horse was erected half way down the avenue leading from the house to Mill Wood. The last building of this creative period was the Temple of 67

71 Generation 9 (con't) the house to Mill Wood. The last building of this creative period was the Temple of Pan (Patcombe Farm op the Bailiff s House) dating from 1771 and probably designed by John Johnson. The fine statue of Pan, which formerly stood to the north of the building is now at Castle Hill, South Molton, Devon. Charles was a close friend of Henry Hoare of Stourhead and painter and landscaper Coplestone Warre Bampfylde of Hestercombe. In its time Halswell was one of the finest picturesque landscapes in the West country. (The following paragraphs are extracts from "Arcadia Under the Plough" Country Life Magazine, Feb , by Gervase Jackson-Stops) Richard Escott, the estate Steward lived in Patcombe House and retired in His memorandum, which is the source of much of this information, was unearthed by Dr Robert Dunning the editor of Somerset volumes of the Victoria Country Houses, much of which has been unearthed my Mrs Jo Silby (A Trustee of the HPT). Escott's year by year summary begins with his appointment in 1753, but by then the formal parterre had been partly naturalized. A painting of 1750 (now at Hellens, Much Marcle) shows the old red-brick pavilion still surviving near the site of the present rotunda. But the terraces have been smoothed away, forming an undulating lawn with a lake, probably based on an earlier, straight-sided canal and ultimately deriving from the round pond of the formal parterre. Near the south-west corner of the house is a curious stepped pyramid crowned by a griffin holding the family coat or arms and this may also date from the 1740s. Built above the main well serving the house, it has an open tank with water gushing into it on one side and an inscription on another face, now, sadly, too weathered to decipher but thought to have been dedicated to "a pure nymph", a possible reference to one of Sir Charles's nieces who died prematurely in 1744 (1733 Jane Tynte?) The first addition to the landscape listed by Escott was the "Rock Work at the head of the canal on the lawn", made in 1754, when he also recorded the remodelling of the east and west fronts of the house by the architect Francis Cartwright of Blanford. This has now disappeared, but another impressive rock work screen or grotto survives at the lower end of the lake. Originally this formed a dam, with a large round pond below, clearly shown on the survey map of Three important structures followed in the next two years: "Mrs Busby's Temple on the Lawn and the Bath Stone Bridge in the Wood" in Together with the "Druid's Temple in the Wood built by De Wilstar" in John Jacob de Wilstar was the surveyor responsible for the 1756 estate map, but he is also recorded as an architect and builder working in Bristol in the 1740s and may have been the author of these buildings. On the other hand they have close affinities with the designs of Thomas Wright of Durham and it is significant that Sir Charles Tynte and his architect friend Thomas Prowse, were both among the subscribers to Wright's Book of Arbours, which appeared at this very moment in The thatched Druid's Temple at the end of the upper end of Mill Wood, sadly destroyed in the 1950s was virtually identical to the engraving on the title page of Arbours while the bridge and rock work screen correspond closely with drawings for a "River Head" and a "Break Water" on adjoining pages of an album of Wright's drawings now in the Avery Library of Columbia University. "Mrs Busby's Temple", apparently named after Lady Tynte's sister, is also comparable to his rotunda at Stoke Gifford in Gloucestershire and Culford, Suffolk. The bridge, which is actually a dam with cascade between two of the ponds in Mill 68

72 Generation 9 (con't) The bridge, which is actually a dam with cascade between two of the ponds in Mill Wood, can be seen under construction - complete with workmen and scaffolding- in the background of a portrait of Sir Charles now at Southside House, Wimbledon. The attribution of this picture to Hogarth has been questioned but there is a payment of 42 to the artist in June 1753, recorded in June 1753, recorded in Tynte's account at Hoare's Bank, and the discrepancy of two years between this and the building of the bridge could be put down to forward planning or to Escott's memory: he was, after all, writing in old age. On the table, the artist also shows a large volume entitled Garden Plans and a set of drawing instruments, suggesting that, as well as being his own garden designer, the ingenious baronet could well have acted as his own architect. The diary he kept during the summer of 1756 survives in the Somerset Record Office and offers a glimpse of the work going on in Mill Wood, the ponds being stocked with goldfish, trout and gudgeon, the Druid's Temple being erected and a constant stream of visitors arriving to see the gardens, including the Egremonts from the nearby Enmore, the Guildfords and Norths, the Bampfyldes and Prowse. After 1756 there was a gap in activities. However in 1761 the park was greatly extended to the East and then, in he embarked on a new spate of buildings beginning with the Temple of Harmony which was erected in 1764 for 400. In the past, this miniature version of the Temple of Virilis (built in the 1st Century BC in Rome) has been attributed to Robert Adam on the basis of a drawing for the interior dated 1767, now in the Soane Museum. However, a letter written to Sir Charles the same year proves that it was actually designed by Thomas Prowse, in memory of their mutual friend Peregrine Palmer, MP for the University of Oxford, who died in Nov The statue of Harmony was dedicated to Prowse after his own death in Now, brought into the house for safekeeping it was carved by the London statuary, John Walsh who received 44 from Sir Charles's account in 1786 and a further 85 in Adam's neo-classical aedicule, supported by Palmyra columns, still exists, though with an antique sarcophagus panel below the niche, in place of the suggested panel. However the plaster work in the manner of Joseph Rose was never carried out and the scrolling frieze must be attributed to the Bristol plasterer Thomas Stocking, to whom Prowse sent a drawing in Aug 1766, with instructions to attend Sir Charles at Halswell. ( This aedicule now contains a statue of Terpsichore made in the modern equivalent of Coade Stone and is a copy of the original marble statue in the Taunton Castle Museum) According to Richard Escott. the "Robin Hood's house" was built in 1765 at a cost of 300 but, if so, it was still being fitted up in 1767 when Sir Charles wrote: " as for the Building on the Hill in the Park, the first room which I call the hermits room, must have an earthen floor, the kitchen on the left, a brick and the little room for the china, must be boarded." In 1765, he also constructed half way down the avenue leading from the house to Mill Wood a strange monument to the memory of a favourite horse. This has now been dismantled and taken to a neighbouring farm where it is protected from the weather. Its inscription is a long and touching elegy. The Following is an extract from Notes on St Edward's Church by RD Ansdell with additions by KC Howison (1997): 69

73 Generation 9 (con't) "The Nave. To the right stands the enormous Monument to Sir Charles Kemeys Tynte who died in Sir Charles was the younger brother to Sir John and a great benefactor to the Church and founder of the Alms Houses nearby (still standing and occupied). As a beautiful italic inscription announces, he "served his country in five parliaments" being a Member first for Monmouth, then Somerset. An allegorical figure, probably representing Fame, is extinguishing a torch. She leans, mourning, upon a pedestal, from which in hung a cameo-like portrait of Sir Charles, who appears to be gazing across the nave to his pew. The monument was designed by Joseph Nollekens ( ) one of the founder members of the Royal Academy. It is signed at the bottom right hand corner. Entries In National Monuments Record Feb 2004: No image available Location : GOATHURST, SEDGEMOOR, SOMERSET IoE number : Date listed : 28 JUL 1950 Date of last amendment : 28 JUL 1950 ST23SE GOATHURST CP HALSWELL PARK 7/38 Halswell House and attached outbuildings at rear GV I Country house in emparked landscape; now flats. South range C16 for Sir Nicholas Halswell; main north range 1689 for Sir Halswell Tynte, earlier house retained as service quarters; north range partly destroyed by fire c1922 when fabric restored and interior refurbished; converted to flats with internal division, particularly south, c1950. North range: Ham Hill ashlar, flat bitumenised roof; stucco on returns; south range: random rubble, some colourwashed, slate roofs, brick and rubble stacks. Baroque north front on imposing scale; 3 storeys, 2:3:2 bays, the outer in shallow wings; rusticated quoins, ramped plinth band, first floor band, first floor sill band, second floor band and band over heads of second floor windows; cornice, baluster parapet. Sash windows with glazing bars; on second floor with square heads in architraves; windows to centre paired, a C18 alteration. Windows to the wings with segmental heads and architraves, outer windows of centre bays with semi-circular heads, elaborate architraves; to first floor, foliate panels over. Centre window of centre 3 stepped forward and emphasised with raising crescendo of ornament eared architrave, flanked by 3 sets of pilasters, inner with carved foliage, centre with scrolled volutes supporting open triangular pediment; moulded keystone supports large painted cartouche, swag each side. Paired three-quarter glazed doors in semi-circular headed recess, fanlight, radiating glazing bars; trophies flanking rusticated pilasters stepped back in 3 stages, to centre represented by quarter column, supports deep cornice which forms narrow balcony, formerly iron rails, now missing. Returns in similar style; left of 5 bays, ground floor rusticated, sash windows with glazing bars, on first floor moulded architraves with cornices, centre window with triangular pediment, baluster panel below. To right of 3 bays, sash windows with glazing bars, centre first floor with semi-circular head in square 70

74 Generation 9 (con't) sash windows with glazing bars, centre first floor with semi-circular head in square head architrave, dentil cornice, baluster panel set below; C18 single-storey bays on ground floor with cornices, between them semi-circular head door opening in rusticated surround, half-glazed door. Contiguous range to south, irregular plan; 2 storeys and attic; stone-mullionpd windows with stopped labels, many renewed, leaded lights, relieving arches. Flat-pointed and 4-centred arch stone door frames. Right return of north front with attached wall to obscure service quarters, emphasised door opening and 2 niches. Interior of service wing with remains of domestic fittings including range of cupboards on ground floor. North range with elaborate plaster and woodwork, much in replica after fire; large open-well staircase, twisted balusters, ramped handrail, panelled newel posts; stairwell with ornamental plaster ceiling, Baroque with wreathing, cartouches, cherubs, corner pilasters; ground floor dining room ceiling, with ribs, garlands, intertwined branches, dentil cornice, in style of fig; first floor room to east with further Baroque ceiling, ornamented with centre wreath with enframing panels, also chinoiserie wallpaper. Centre rooms to ground and first floor more restrained, on ground floor fielded panelling; 3 fine C18 chimney pieces, room on right of ground floor with chimney piece removed, C16 plaster overmantel reset above a doorway between house and service wing. Further lesser features. Country Life, November ; Collinson, Somerset I, 1791; VCH Somerset 11, 1911). Location : GOATHURST, SEDGEMOOR, SOMERSET IoE number : Date listed : 09 JAN 1987 Date of last amendment : 09 JAN 1987 ST23SE GOATHURST CP HALSWELL PARK Stepped pyramid to west of 7/39 Halswall House GV II Stepped pyramid, in honour of a pure nymph. C18. Dressed stone. Square on plan. Pyramid on a high plinth, capping gryphon. Lias panel to North side of plinth. (Pevsner N., Buildings of England, South and West Somerset, 1958; Country Life, Nov ;; Collinson, Somerset 1, 1791; VCH Somerset II, 1911; Garden History, V, ; Jones B, Follies and Grottoes, 1974). Location : GOATHURST, SEDGEMOOR, SOMERSET IoE number : Date listed : 28 JUL 1950 Date of last amendment : 09 JAN 1987 ST23SE GOATHURST CP HALSWELL PARK galling and gateway, with 7/40 attached coach house to north side of former stable yard of Halswell House (previously listed as Coach House) GV II Walling, gateway and attached coach house. C18. Driveway entrance to stable yard with gateway, ashlar piers with pyramidal caps, plain paired wrought-iron gates with spear caps. Section of brick-faced rubble wall to each side. That to left attached to brick and rubble coach house; crenellated parapet, hipped slate roof; oblong on plan, plain style, 3 semi-circular head openings with stone keys and imposts, double wooden doors in each. (Pevsner N, Buildings of England, South and West Soaerset, 1958; Country Life, Nov. 21, 1908; Collinson, Somerset 1, 1791; VCH Somerset II, 1911; Garden History, V, 3, 1977; Jones B., Follies and Grottoes, 71

75 Generation 9 (con't) Somerset II, 1911; Garden History, V, 3, 1977; Jones B., Follies and Grottoes, 1974). Location : GOATHURST, SEDGEMOOR, SOMERSET IoE number : Date listed : 28 JUL 1950 Date of last amendment : 09 JAN 1987 ST23SE GOATHURST CP HALSWELL PARK 7/41 Walling and piers to East side of former stable yard of Halswell House, lean-to at rear, part converted to dwelling, (Grassby) (formerly listed with Dovecote) GV II Walling and piers with lean-to at rear, part of which is now dwelling. C18. High Flemish bond brick wall, approximately 50 metres long, dressed stone coping divided into 11 bays by blind semi-circular headed recesses forming an arcade, emphasised imposts; central recess with broad pilasters to each side and pierced by a door opening, panelled door with a moulded slab hood on cut brackets; moulded crowning cornice. Giant rusticated brick gate piers to each end with moulded stone caps. Along the rear of the wall a single storey lean-to, part of which has been converted to a dwelling, necessitating the right 5 recesses on frontage being pierced by mid C20 one, 2 and 3-light casements with glazing bars. Further short section of walling to left of left gateway, some crenellated capping. (Pevsner N, Buildings of England, South and West Somerset, 1958; Country Life, November ; Collinson, Somerset I, 1791; VCH Somerset II, 1911; Garden History V, , 27; Jones B, Follies and Grottoes, 1974). Location : GOATHURST, SEDGEMOOR, SOMERSET IoE number : Date listed : 28 JUL 1950 Date of last amendment : 28 JUL 1950 ST23SE GOATHURST CP HALSWELL PARK 7/42 Dovecote about 20 m south of Halswell House GV II Dovecote. C17. Rubble with some roughcast, ogival slate roof, at open turret at apex with an arcade of turned balusters, zinc cupola. Small door opening to East. Interior completely lined with nesting holes for birds. (Pevsner N., Buildings of England, South and West Somerset, 1958; Country Life, Nov. 21, 1908; Collinson, Somerset I, 1791; VCH Somerset II, 1911; Garden History V, ; Jones B., Follies and Grottoes, 1974). Location : GOATHURST, SEDGEMOOR, SOMERSET IoE number : Date listed : 28 JUL 1950 Date of last amendment : 28 JUL 1950 ST23SE GOATHURST CP HALSWELL PARK 7/43 Rotunda about 110 north-east of 72

76 Generation 9 (con't) 7/43 Rotunda about 110 north-east of Halswell House 28,7.50 GV II Temple with ice house under. C18, Dressed stone. Circular on plan. Plinth of 3 stone steps, stone setts. Colonnade of 8 Roman Doric columns; triglyph frieze with bucranium and medallions. Domed stone roof, lead sheeting removed at time of re-survey (Feb. 1985). (Pevsner., Buildings of England, South and West Somerset, 1958; Country Life, Nov. 21, 1908; Collinson, Somerset I, 1791; VCH, Somerset II, 1911; Garden History V, 3, 1977; Jones B., Follies and Grottoes, 1974). Location : GOATHURST, SEDGEMOOR, SOMERSET IoE number : Date listed : 04 JAN 1982 Date of last amendment : 04 JAN 1982 ST23SE GOATHURST CP GOATHURST VILLAGE 7/163 Entrance gateway to Halswell House adjacent to No. 30 (The Lodge) GV II Early/mid C19. Rubble and dressed stone. Two low convex quadrant walls, square plinth and coping, bounded by square piers with cornice bands and pyramidal caps. Walls crowned by wrought-iron railings with curved finials. Location : GOATHURST, SEDGEMOOR, SOMERSET IoE number : Date listed : 04 JAN 1982 Date of last amendment : 09 JAN 1987 ST23SE GOATHURST CP GOATHURST VILLAGE 7/162 No. 30 (The Lodge) (previously listed as Former Lodge to Halswell Park) GV II Lodge to Halswell House (qv), on roadside. Early C19. Rendered, hipped thatch roof with deep eaves resting on rustic poles forming a verandah. T-plan, picturesque cottage ornee style. Diamond paned casements with leaded lights. Plain square-headed door opening, plank door. Important roadside feature. 73

77 Generation 9 (con't) Generation HALSWELL 10 TYNTE (John 9, Halswell 8, Jane 7 Halswell, Hugh 6 Halswell, Nicholas 5 Halswell, Robert 4 Halswell, Nicholas 3 Halswell, John 2 Halswell, Richard 1 Halswell) was born on 15 Nov He died on 12 Nov He married Mary Walters in She was born in Brecon. Halswell Tynte and Mary Walters had the following children: i. MARY 11 TYNTE. She died in ii. JANE TYNTE. She died in JANE 10 TYNTE (John 9, Halswell 8, Jane 7 Halswell, Hugh 6 Halswell, Nicholas 5 Halswell, Robert 4 Halswell, Nicholas 3 Halswell, John 2 Halswell, Richard 1 Halswell) was born on 27 Jul She died on 23 Jul She met (1) RUISHE HASSEL. He died on 06 Jun Generation 11 Ruishe Hassel and Jane Tynte had the following child: 12. i. JANE 11 HASSEL was born on 14 Apr She died on 29 Jan She met (1) JOHN JOHNSON. He was born about He died on 31 May JANE 11 HASSEL (Jane 10 Tynte, John 9 Tynte, Halswell 8 Tynte, Jane 7 Halswell, Hugh 6 Halswell, Nicholas 5 Halswell, Robert 4 Halswell, Nicholas 3 Halswell, John 2 Halswell, Richard 1 Halswell) was born on 14 Apr She died on 29 Jan She met (1) JOHN JOHNSON. He was born about He died on 31 May Notes for Jane Hassel: Extract from Burke's Peerage and Baronetage p 2806: "They {Jane and her husband} assumed by Royal License the name and arms of "Kemeys-Tynte" Note: this is the first appearance of the hypenated surname of Kemeys-Tynte. Perviously the Tynte family had sometimes used it as a Christian name only. John Johnson and Jane Hassel had the following children: i. JANE 12 KEMEYS-TYNTE was born in She died on 17 Nov ii. ANN GEORGINA KEMEYS-TYNTE was born in She died in 1860 in London. 13. iii. CHARLES KEMEYS KEMEYS-TYNTE was born on 29 May 1778 in London. He died on 74

78 Generation 11 (con't) 13. iii. C K K was born on 29 May 1778 in London. He died on 22 Nov 1860 in Halswell House. He met (1) ANN LEYSON. She was born in She died on 26 Apr He met (2) ELIZABETH DREW. Generation CHARLES KEMEYS 12 KEMEYS-TYNTE (Jane 11 Hassel, Jane 10 Tynte, John 9 Tynte, Halswell 8 Tynte, Jane 7 Halswell, Hugh 6 Halswell, Nicholas 5 Halswell, Robert 4 Halswell, Nicholas 3 Halswell, John 2 Halswell, Richard 1 Halswell) was born on 29 May 1778 in London. He died on 22 Nov 1860 in Halswell House. He met (1) ANN LEYSON. She was born in She died on 26 Apr He met (2) ELIZABETH DREW. Notes for Charles Kemeys Kemeys-Tynte: Extract from Somerset Archive and Record Service at Obridge Road, Taunton, Somerset, TA2 7PU United Kingdom Jun Tynte Ann Kemys - Charles esq and Ann Jul Tynte Henrietta Ane Kemeys - Charles and Ann Oct Tynte Jane Kemys - Charles and Ann Jan Tynte Louisa Kemys - Charles and Ann Mar Tynye Charles John Kemeys - Charles and Ann Extract From Burke's Peerage and Baronetage: "Col CK Kemeys-Tynte was declared by the Committee of Privileges of the House of Lords 1845 co-heir of the whole blood to the Barony of Wharton but no further proceedings were taken." May have been the first an unsuccessful applicant for the restoration of the Baronetcy of Wharton. (See Charles Theodore Kemys-Tynte 1916 notes) and also ( Source: Web: which states:" adjudged one of the heirs of the Barony of Wharton" KEMEYS, KEMMIS or KEMYS ARMORIAL BEARINGS Arms - Vert, on a chevron argent three pheons sable. Crest - On a mount vert a unicorn azure sejant, armed crined and unguled or. Motto - Duw dy ras. (God thy right) E Mail from Edward Griffin of Australia dated 29 Nov 99: "I have a number of pictures of the K-Ts, mainly of Colonel Charles Kemeys K-T and his family. I have also have a letter written to the colonel by his son while away at school in the early part of the 19th Century. I also have a number of prints of Halswell. We also have in the family numerous documents collected by St David Morgan K-T, who I think must have been that generation's historian. We have copies of the Country Life features on both Halswell and Cefn from around There also numerous documents concerning the links to the Whartons, Brabazons and Daubeneys. You're probably familiar with book by Edward Wharton on the "Whartons of Wharton Hall" and Melville's "Philip, Duke of Wharton" - I have copies of these if not." Source: Edward Griffin [ @domain.com] "In 1844 colonel Charles Kemeys Kemey-Tynte claimed the barony of Wharton and in 1845 got the duke's outlawry reversed on technical grounds: but only succeeded in proving that four other descendants of daughters of the fourth lord - Mr. Cochrane Wishart Baille, Mrs Aufrere, Lord 75

79 Generation 12 (con't) descendants of daughters of the fourth lord - Mr. Cochrane Wishart Baille, Mrs Aufrere, Lord Willoughby D'Eresby and the marquis of Cholmondeley - had equal right to the title." SourceThe Whartons of Wharton Hall by Edward Ross Wharton MA pub OUP 1898 page 58 Notes from The HIstory of Parliament Ref: Constituency Dates BRIDGWATER Family and Education b. 29 May 1778, o.s. of John Johnson (afterwards Kemeys Tynte) of Burhill and Jane, da. of Ruisshe Hassell, maj. R. Horse Gds., niece and h. of Sir Charles Kemeys Tynte, 5th bt., of Halswell and Cefn Mably. educ. Eton 1791; St. John s, Camb m. 25 Apr. 1798, Anne, da. of Rev. Thomas Leyson of Bassaleg, Mon., wid. of Thomas Lewis of St. Pierre, Mon., 1s. 4da. (1 d.v.p.). suc. fa d. 23 Nov Offices Held Sheriff, Som Lt.-col. W. Som. yeomanry cav. 1803, col Provincial grand master of freemasons Biography Kemeys Tynte s father, a colonel in the Grenadier Guards who was appointed comptroller of the household of the prince of Wales in 1791, had changed his name by royal licence in 1785 on inheriting the estates of his wife s uncle, which comprised the extensive properties of two very old parliamentary families, the Kemeys of Glamorganshire and the Tyntes of Somerset. Charles was the residuary legatee of his father s estate, which was sworn under 10,000 in June At the general election of 1820 he was invited to contest Bridgwater free of all expense by the Foxite independent party, after a deal had been struck with one of the sitting Members, William Astell, and the corporation interest. He was duly returned unopposed, pledged to support the cause of political integrity and independence, disclaiming a bigotted adherence to any party or any set of men and declaring his warm attachment to the glorious constitution under which we live.3 He was not the most assiduous of attenders, but he acted consistently with the Whig opposition to Lord Liverpool s ministry on all major issues, including parliamentary reform, 31 May 1821, 24 Apr He was granted a month s leave for urgent private business, 15 Feb., and therefore missed the division on Catholic relief, 28 Feb. 1821, but he voted for it, 21 Apr., 10 May In presenting a Bridgwater petition in support of Queen Caroline, 24 Jan. 1821, he declared that the proceedings against her were in opposition to the established laws of the country and represented a violent attack upon the constitution. He supported inquiry into the Peterloo massacre, 16 May 1821, but was anxious to eulogise the yeomanry as a most valuable and peculiarly constitutional force and said that they were the only party that could be entirely exculpated from blame for the events at Manchester. In January 1822 he attended a public meeting at Taunton where he expressed support for a petition for relief from agricultural distress.4 He argued that retrenchment ought to begin by the abolition of sinecures and the reduction of pensions, 15 Feb.5 He defended 76

80 Generation 12 (con't) ought to begin by the abolition of sinecures and the reduction of pensions, 15 Feb.5 He defended the conduct of the Somerset magistrates in relation to the scandal at Ilchester gaol, 10 May 1822, contending that so general a charge ought not to be made as many were not implicated in the transactions complained of. He was granted a month s leave for urgent private business, 14 Feb In February 1826 he was requisitioned to stand again for Bridgwater at the next general election and responded with a lengthy address announcing that despite his personal wish to retire from parliamentary life, with its attendant interruption to all domestic and social habits... fatigue and injury to health and other vexatious circumstances which made it extremely irksome to me, he felt it his principal duty to submit to your wishes.6 At the dissolution in June handbills were circulated in the borough condemning his support for Catholic relief, and a Protestant candidate was eventually found to stand against him, but his alliance with Astell remained firm and he was comfortably returned in second place.7 He voted to disfranchise Penryn, 28 May He divided for repeal of the Test Acts, 26 Feb., and Catholic relief, 12 May In February 1829 Planta, the Wellington ministry s patronage secretary, listed him as likely to be with government for Catholic emancipation, and he duly voted for it, 6 Mar. He presented a Bridgwater petition for repeal of the house and window taxes, 12 Mar He divided for Knatchbull s amendment to the address on distress, 4 Feb., and was granted a month s leave for urgent private business, 2 Mar In presenting a Bridgwater licensed victuallers petition against the sale of beer bill, 27 Apr., he stated that the petitioners also wished to have cider sellers put on the same footing as beer sellers, and observed that since the reduction in the cider tax there had been about a hundred little cider shops established in the town and immediate neighbourhood by the lowest description of persons, tending to demoralize the lower orders and increase pauperism. He divided against the bill, 4 May, and paired for the amendment to prohibit on-consumption, 21 June. He voted to abolish the Irish lord lieutenancy, 11 May, for information on privy councillors emoluments, 14 May, and reduction of the grant for South American missions, 7 June 1830, when he divided to abolish the death penalty for forgery. At the general election that summer he was again invited to stand for Bridgwater at no expense and was returned unopposed with Astell, boasting afterwards that it was without precedent in the annals of parliamentary history for a Member to be elected for the same seat, a third time successively, at the call and by the unsolicited and free voice of the people.8 The Wellington ministry listed Kemeys Tynte among the doubtful doubtfuls, with the optimistic parenthetical remark that he was a friend. He was absent from the crucial civil list division, 15 Nov He presented a Bridgwater anti-slavery petition, 18 Nov., and was granted a fortnight s leave on account of the disturbed state of his neighbourhood, 6 Dec He presented a Bridgwater petition in favour of parliamentary reform, 1 Mar., and divided for the second reading of the Grey ministry s bill, 22 Mar., and against Gascoyne s wrecking amendment, 19 Apr At the ensuing dissolution he received a requisition from Bridgwater signed by some 200 electors, which praised the steady, consistent and manly course you have pursued during this eventful period. He campaigned independently of Astell, who was being challenged by another reformer, and said he looked forward to the bill s passage inaugurating an era of purity of election, confidence between representatives and electors, honest votes in Parliament, abolition of sinecure places and unmerited pensions, abolition of slavery and reduction of taxes. He was returned at the head of the poll and promised to discharge my future duties in such a manner as may... tend to the honour and dignity of the crown and the support of the constitution.9 He divided for the second reading of the reintroduced reform bill, 6 July, supported its details in committee and voted for its passage, 21 Sept., and Lord Ebrington s confidence motion, 10 Oct He voted to punish only those guilty of bribery at the Dublin election, 23 Aug. It was reported that his name was on the list for a coronation peerage, recommended by the duke of Sussex, but in the hasty arrangements that followed this was apparently refused. His name continued to be mentioned in connection with the possible mass creation of peers by the government, and it was observed that his income amounts to more than twice the sum adequate to the support of the dignity of the peerage.10 He divided for the second reading of the revised reform bill, 17 Dec. 1831, supported it in committee and voted for the third reading, 22 Mar He voted for Ebrington s motion for an address asking the king to appoint only ministers committed to carrying an unimpaired reform measure, 10 May. He paired against increasing Scotland s representation, 1 June. He divided with ministers on the Russian-Dutch loan, 26 Jan., and relations with Portugal, 9 Feb

81 Generation 12 (con't) Kemeys Tynte was returned unopposed for Bridgwater at the general election of 1832 and sat, entertaining Whig opinions,11 until his retirement in He belatedly joined Brooks s Club, 22 Feb In 1845 the House of Lords committee of privileges declared him to be senior co-heir to the barony of Wharton, but no further proceedings were taken to revive this title in his lifetime and it was not until 1916 that his great-grandson was summoned to the Lords as the 8th baron. He died in November 1860 and was succeeded by his son, Charles Kemeys Tynte ( ), Liberal Member for West Somerset, , and Bridgwater, It appears that he had several illegitimate children with Elizabeth Drewe, who went under the name Dowdney.12 Ref Volumes: Author: Terry Jenkins Notes 1. Bristol Mirror, 30 Sept. 1820; Gent. Mag. (1861), i PROB 11/1445/517; IR26/112/ Add , Symes to Holland, 26 Feb.; Taunton Courier, 23 Feb., 8 Mar Taunton Courier, 16 Jan The Times, 16 Feb Som. RO, Kemeys Tynte mss DD/S/WH 351; Taunton Courier, 15 Feb Taunton Courier, 14, 21 June Ibid. 30 June, 7, 28 July, 4 Aug Kemeys Tynte mss DD/S/WH 352; Bridgwater Herald, 4 May; Taunton Courier, 18 May Bristol Mirror, 13 Aug.; Heron, Notes, 199; Arundel Castle mss MD 2613, anon. to Burdett, 31 Oct Dod s Parl. Companion (1833), Kemeys Tynte mss, introduction to catalogue. Ref Volumes: Author: Terry Jenkins Notes 1. Bristol Mirror, 30 Sept. 1820; Gent. Mag. (1861), i PROB 11/1445/517; IR26/112/ Add , Symes to Holland, 26 Feb.; Taunton Courier, 23 Feb., 8 Mar Taunton Courier, 16 Jan The Times, 16 Feb Som. RO, Kemeys Tynte mss DD/S/WH 351; Taunton Courier, 15 Feb Taunton Courier, 14, 21 June Ibid. 30 June, 7, 28 July, 4 Aug Kemeys Tynte mss DD/S/WH 352; Bridgwater Herald, 4 May; Taunton Courier, 18 May Bristol Mirror, 13 Aug.; Heron, Notes, 199; Arundel Castle mss MD 2613, anon. to Burdett, 31 Oct Dod s Parl. Companion (1833), Kemeys Tynte mss, introduction to catalogue. Charles Kemeys Kemeys-Tynte and Ann Leyson had the following children: 14. i. CHARLES JOHN 13 KEMEYS-TYNTE was born on 13 Mar 1800 in Halswell House. He died on 16 Sep 1882 in Torquay. He met (1) ELIZABETH SWINNERTON. She died on 10 May He married Vincentia Brabazon, daughter of Wallop Brabazon, on 15 Apr She died on 14 Oct

82 Generation 12 (con't) 15. ii. ANN KEMEYS-TYNTE was born on 21 Jun She died in She met (1) WILLIAM HENRY COOPER. He died on 14 Jan iii. JANE KEMEYS-TYNTE was born on 01 Oct She died on 21 Sep iv. LOUISA KEMEYS-TYNTE was born on 11 Jan She died on 31 Aug She married Simon Fraser Campbell in He died in Mar Generation v. HENRIETTA ANNE KEMEYS-TYNTE was born on 27 Jul She died on 24 Mar She married Thomas Arthur Kemmis, son of Henry Kemmis and Maria Dawson, in He was born on 16 Mar He died on 25 Dec 1858 in Sanderstead, Surrey. Charles Kemeys Kemeys-Tynte and Elizabeth Drew had the following child: vi. DOWDNEY was born about CHARLES JOHN 13 KEMEYS-TYNTE (Charles Kemeys 12, Jane 11 Hassel, Jane 10 Tynte, John 9 Tynte, Halswell 8 Tynte, Jane 7 Halswell, Hugh 6 Halswell, Nicholas 5 Halswell, Robert 4 Halswell, Nicholas 3 Halswell, John 2 Halswell, Richard 1 Halswell) was born on 13 Mar 1800 in Halswell House. He died on 16 Sep 1882 in Torquay. He met (1) ELIZABETH SWINNERTON. She died on 10 May He married Vincentia Brabazon, daughter of Wallop Brabazon, on 15 Apr She died on 14 Oct Notes for Charles John Kemeys-Tynte: SteepHolm A brief history of the island of a unique island Steep holm sits in the Severn Estuary like the hump of an ancient creature left behind by evolution. It is part of the landscape and as such I feel that many people do not really look at it. Really look at it that is. I myself am one of those people and was quite fascinated when I did some research into it. The history between Steep holm and man is a long one. It spans at least a thousand years from the viking's to the present. The viking's used the island in 914 and are the earliest confirmed resident's of the island. There is a link though with the monk and historian Gildas (aprox ) who is supposed to have stayed on two islands between the Welsh and English coasts. This is based on information by John Leland who was antiquary to Henry VII and had access to manuscripts that have long since been destroyed. The earliest ruins on Steep Holm are that of the mediaeval priory. This was setup by Augustinian canons, who most likely came from Woodspring Priory, as a cell and retreat. It was occupied between 1166 and 1260 when the last Robert de Tregoz was the patron. Not a lot really happened on steep holm until the 19th century when in 1831 it became the property of Col. Charles Kemeys kemeys-tynte. In 1832 he built a house on the island just above the landing beach. This was to later become the islands one and only inn which no longer survives in any real form. The Tynte family reatained an interest in the running of Steep Holm in the 1830's. After that though it was let out to a series of tennants. In 1865 Dame Anne Cooper,signing on behalf of the now dead col. Tynte, granted the war department use of the island to construct gun batteries and fortifications. There were six emplacements built in 1867 and were given some of the largest and last muzzle loaded guns made. It also has the distinction of being the only Victorian heavy battery in britain that still has it's guns. In 1903 the war office abandoned the island. Then, due to the outbreak of the 79

83 Generation 13 (con't) In 1903 the war office abandoned the island. Then, due to the outbreak of the second world war, in 1941 fortifications were built on Steep Holm for the purpose of stopping any invasion force from coming up the channel. In 1974 the Kenneth Allsop Trust took over the management of the island in the memory of the naturalist and television presenter. Nempnett Thrubwell "NEMPNETT-THRUBWELL, a parish in the hundred of Keynsham, county Somerset, 8 miles N.E. of Axbridge, and 9 from Bristol. Blagdon is its post town. The parish, which is of small extent, is situated under the Mendip hills, near the river Yeo. At Fairyfield is an extensive barrow of an oval form, measuring 180 feet by 60, and 45 in height. Its summit is covered with ash trees and shrubs. On being opened in 1789 it was found to contain two rows of cells, running from S. to N., formed by immense stones set edgeways, and covered by others of larger dimensions. Skulls, a vast heap of bones, and other relics, having been discovered, it is conjectured to have been a work of the Druids, and the cemetery belonging to their great temple at Stanton-Drew, 3 miles distant. The village is small. The inhabitants are chiefly engaged in dairy farming. The soil is of various quality, but chiefly good meadow land. The living is a perpetual curacy* in the diocese of Bath and Wells, value 265. The church, dedicated to St. Mary, is an ancient structure with a tower containing five bells. The register dates from From the churchyard on Knap Hill an extensive view of the surrounding country is obtained. The charities produce about 30 per annum. The National school is situated in the parish of Butcomb, but serves for this parish also. The Baptists have a place of worship. Sir Charles Kemeys Tynte, Bart., is lord of the manor and chief landowner." From The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland (1868) Transcribed by Colin Hinson 2003 Charles John Kemeys-Tynte and Elizabeth Swinnerton had the following children: 17. i. CHARLES KEMEYS 14 KEMEYS-TYNTE was born on 16 Mar 1822 in Donhead St Mary, Wilts. He died on 10 Jan 1891 in Cefn Mably Glamorgan. He married (1) MARY FROME in 1848 in St George's Hanover Square London. She was born on 06 Dec 1824 in Holbrook House, Wincanton, Somerset. She died on 26 May 1864 in Cefn Mably Glamorgan. He married (2) HANNAH LEWIS on 18 Dec He married (3) ELIZABETH FOTHERGILL, daughter of Richard Fothergill, on 18 Sep She died on 18 Mar ii. MILBORNE KEMEYS-TYNTE was born in He died on 10 Mar 1845 in Ireland. Charles John Kemeys-Tynte and Vincentia Brabazon had the following children: iii. JOHN BRABAZON KEMEYS-TYNTE was born on 24 Jun iv. CLIFFORD WHARTON CHARLES KEMEYS-TYNTE was born on 02 Aug v. ST DAVID MORGAN KEMEYS-TYNTE was born on 01 Mar 1846 in Cefn Mably Glamorgan. He died in He married Alice Hammond on 21 Apr vi. ARTHUR MARCUS PHILLIPS KEMEYS-TYNTE was born on 22 Mar vii. FORTESCUE TRACEY FREAKE KEMEYS-TYNTE was born on 31 Jan viii. EDWARD PLANTAGENET KEMEYS-TYNTE was born on 13 Sep He married Beatrice Mary Daubney on 21 Feb She died on 04 Apr ix. MAUDE MARIA KEMEYS-TYNTE was born about x. BLANCHE ELIZABETH PLANTAGENET KEMEYS-TYNTE was born about She died in 1936 in England. She married Edgar Dewdney on 22 Sep He died on 08 Aug

84 Generation 13 (con't) Notes for Blanche Elizabeth Plantagenet Kemeys-Tynte: A newly-published book entitled The Frontier World of Edgar Dewdney (written by Brian Titley, and published in Vancouver by UBCPress, 1999) has just landed on my desk, and page 135 has this to say about the bride of Edgar Dewdney: "Early in 1909, he took a three-month holiday in England, spending most of the time with family and friends in his native Devonshire. While there, he married for the second time. His new bride was Blanche, the daughter of Colonel Charles T. Kemeys-Tynte of Halawell, Bridgewater, Somerset, the member of parliament who had introduced him to Colonial Secretary Bulwer-Lytton almost fifty years earlier." Does this help at all? I wonder if the "Halawell" cited above is supposed to be "Halswell"? At any rate, I thought I would share this new information with you. Susan M. Kooyman Archivist, Glenbow Archives 130-9th Avenue S.E. Calgary, Alberta T2G 0P3 ph: fax: skooyman@glenbow.org web: Notes for Edgar Dewdney: The Glenbow Archives is actually in Calgary, Alberta, not in British Columbia, but it is still a very long way from England. The Dewdney papers have been microfilmed, and are available for use via Interlibrary Loan. We have very little in the way of personal papers of the second Mrs. Dewdney, other than sympathy letters written to her on her husband's death. However, here are a few more details from the Edgar Dewdney entry in the Dictionary of Canadian Biography: Her full name was Blanche Elizabeth Plantagenet Kemeys-Tynte, and Edgar Dewdney met her on an extended visit to England in She was the youngest daughter of a man he had known in his youth. They married in Somerset, then returned to Victoria, British Columbia, where she nursed him through the last few years of his life. He died in 1916, and she subsequently returned to England, where she died in Here in the Glenbow Archives we have two letters written to her after she returned to England. The first, dated 1924, is addressed to Mrs. Dewdney, 13 Johnstone Street, Bath, and the second letter, dated 1926, is addressed to her at 12A Johnstone Street, Bath. I hope this information is useful. Please let me know if you have any further questions. Susan M. Kooyman Archivist, Glenbow Archives 130-9th Avenue S.E. Calgary, Alberta T2G 0P3 ph: fax: skooyman@glenbow.org web: 81

85 Generation 13 (con't) 15. ANN 13 KEMEYS-TYNTE (Charles Kemeys 12, Jane 11 Hassel, Jane 10 Tynte, John 9 Tynte, Halswell 8 Tynte, Jane 7 Halswell, Hugh 6 Halswell, Nicholas 5 Halswell, Robert 4 Halswell, Nicholas 3 Halswell, John 2 Halswell, Richard 1 Halswell) was born on 21 Jun She died in She met (1) WILLIAM HENRY COOPER. He died on 14 Jan William Henry Cooper and Ann Kemeys-Tynte had the following child: i. ISABELLA ANN KEMEYS 14 COOPER was born in She died in HENRIETTA ANNE 13 KEMEYS-TYNTE (Charles Kemeys 12, Jane 11 Hassel, Jane 10 Tynte, John 9 Tynte, Halswell 8 Tynte, Jane 7 Halswell, Hugh 6 Halswell, Nicholas 5 Halswell, Robert 4 Halswell, Nicholas 3 Halswell, John 2 Halswell, Richard 1 Halswell) was born on 27 Jul She died on 24 Mar She married Thomas Arthur Kemmis, son of Henry Kemmis and Maria Dawson, in He was born on 16 Mar He died on 25 Dec 1858 in Sanderstead, Surrey. Notes for Thomas Arthur Kemmis: XXVI. Thomas Arthur Kemmis: Born 16th. March 1806: educated at Eton; matriculated at Christ Church, Oxford, 15th. April 1825: of Croham Hurst, Croydon, Surrey, by purchase,: of Durrow King's Co. Aforesaid: Lieutenant and Captain in H.M. Regiment of Grenadier Guards: Captain half pay unattached 9th. December 1830: J.P. for Co. Surrey: M.P. for East Looe, 1831: died at Croham Hurst, 25th. December 1858: buried at Sanderstead, Surrey: M.I.: Married 14th. September 1833 at Goathurst (99) Henrietta Ann, daughter of Colonel Charles Kemeys-Tynte, (see Kemeys of Cefn-Mably) of Halswell, parish of Halswell, Co. Sumerset, of Cefn-Mably, parish of Michaelston-y-Vedw, Cos. Glamorgan and Monmouth, and of Burhill, parish of Walton-upon-Thames, Surrey, J.P. and D.L. for Cos. Somerset, Glamorgan, Monmouth, and Surrey, High Sheriff for Co. Somerset 1800, M.P. for Bridgewater , F.S.A., adjudged one of the heirs of the Barony of Wharton; she died March Father of,... Source: Web: Thomas Arthur Kemmis and Henrietta Anne Kemeys-Tynte had the following child: i. ARTHUR HENRY NICHOLAS 14 KEMMIS was born on 13 Jul He died on 05 Jan He married Emma Jane Collins on 11 Jul Notes for Arthur Henry Nicholas Kemmis: XXV. Arthur Henry Nicholas Kemmis: born 13th. July 1834: of Croham Hurst, Surrey, and of Durrow, King's Co. aforesaid: matriculated at Merton College, Oxford, 2nd. June 1853: Lieutenant 1st. Somerset Militia 20th. September 1854, Captain 13th. April 1861: J.P. for Surrey in 1860 and J.P. and High Sheriff for King's Co. 1862: D.L.: married 1862, Emma Jane, daughter of... Collins Esq. Generation 14 Source: Web: CHARLES KEMEYS 14 KEMEYS-TYNTE (Charles John 13, Charles Kemeys 12, Jane 11 Hassel, Jane 10 Tynte, John 9 Tynte, Halswell 8 Tynte, Jane 7 Halswell, Hugh 6 Halswell, Nicholas 5 Halswell, Robert 4 Halswell, Nicholas 3 Halswell, John 2 Halswell, Richard 1 Halswell) was born on 16 Mar 1822 in Donhead St Mary, Wilts. He died on 10 Jan 1891 in Cefn Mably Glamorgan. He married (1) MARY FROME in 1848 in St George's Hanover Square London. She was born on 06 Dec 1824 in Holbrook House, Wincanton, Somerset. She died on 26 May 1864 in Cefn Mably Glamorgan. He married (2) HANNAH LEWIS on 18 Dec He married (3) ELIZABETH FOTHERGILL, daughter of Richard Fothergill, on 18 Sep She died on 18 Mar Charles Kemeys Kemeys-Tynte and Mary Frome had the following children: 19. i. HALSWELL MILBORNE 15 KEMEYS-TYNTE was born on 05 Jun 1852 in Halswell House. He died on 18 Feb 1899 in Halswell House. He met (1) ROSABELLE CLARE WALSH. She was born in 1857 in County Kildare. She died on 18 Aug 1931 in Bishop's Hull, 82

86 Generation 14 (con't) She was born in 1857 in County Kildare. She died on 18 Aug 1931 in Bishop's Hull, ii. Taunton. RACHEL HENRIETTA ELIZABETH KEMEYS-TYNTE was born on 09 Oct 1856 in Cefn Mably Glamorgan. She died in 1940 in Bath. iii. CHARLES HARLEY MORTON KEMEYS-TYNTE was born on 14 May Charles Kemeys Kemeys-Tynte and Hannah Lewis had the following child: iv. GRACE KEMEYS-TYNTE. 18. EDWARD PLANTAGENET 14 KEMEYS-TYNTE (Charles John 13, Charles Kemeys 12, Jane 11 Hassel, Jane 10 Tynte, John 9 Tynte, Halswell 8 Tynte, Jane 7 Halswell, Hugh 6 Halswell, Nicholas 5 Halswell, Robert 4 Halswell, Nicholas 3 Halswell, John 2 Halswell, Richard 1 Halswell) was born on 13 Sep He married Beatrice Mary Daubney on 21 Feb She died on 04 Apr Notes for Edward Plantagenet Kemeys-Tynte: E Mail from Edward Griffin of Australia dated 30 Nov 99: "My grandmother was Mary Vincentia Blanche Edwardrina Kemeys-Tynte, daughter of Edward Plantagenet K-T. He was the youngest son of Charles John K-T. " Generation 15 Source: Edward Griffin [ @domain.com] Edward Plantagenet Kemeys-Tynte and Beatrice Mary Daubney had the following children: 20. i. MARY VINCENTIA BLANCHE EDWARDRINA 15 KEMEYS-TYNTE. She married William Arnold Riley on 12 Jun ii. BEATRICE MARGARET GWLADYS CLARE KEMEYS-TYNTE. She married Eric Blake Herbert Johnson, son of George Herbert Johnson, on 27 Apr HALSWELL MILBORNE 15 KEMEYS-TYNTE (Charles Kemeys 14, Charles John 13, Charles Kemeys 12, Jane 11 Hassel, Jane 10 Tynte, John 9 Tynte, Halswell 8 Tynte, Jane 7 Halswell, Hugh 6 Halswell, Nicholas 5 Halswell, Robert 4 Halswell, Nicholas 3 Halswell, John 2 Halswell, Richard 1 Halswell) was born on 05 Jun 1852 in Halswell House. He died on 18 Feb 1899 in Halswell House. He met (1) ROSABELLE CLARE WALSH. She was born in 1857 in County Kildare. She died on 18 Aug 1931 in Bishop's Hull, Taunton. Notes for Halswell Milborne Kemeys-Tynte: Had a possible illegitimate son, Halswell Tynte (born 1879), who had a son, Bernard Kemeys Tynte. Bernard was fascinated by the family history, visited Halswell and Cefn Mably often. He proposed to a lady that he thought would inherit Halswell House and he scratched his name on the Halswell monument as " BK Tynte". Halswell Milborne Kemeys-Tynte and Rosabelle Clare Walsh had the following children: 22. i. CHARLES THEODORE HALSWELL 16 KEMEYS-TYNTE was born on 18 Sep 1876 in Dover. He died on 04 Mar 1934 in Westminster. He met (1) DOROTHY ELLIS. She was born in She died on 03 Aug ii. EUSTACE KEMEYS-TYNTE was born on 10 Apr 1878 in Bath. He died on 11 Nov 1949 in Llandridod Wells in Wales. He married Annie Emerson on 13 Aug 1902 in Michaelstone y Vedw. She was born in She died on 19 Jan iii. MARY ARABELLA SWINNERTON KEMEYS-TYNTE was born on 06 Apr She died on 01 Jul She married Guy Colin Campbell on 21 Apr He was born on 31 Jan MARY VINCENTIA BLANCHE EDWARDRINA 15 KEMEYS-TYNTE (Edward Plantagenet 14, Charles John 13, Charles Kemeys 12, Jane 11 Hassel, Jane 10 Tynte, John 9 Tynte, Halswell 8 Tynte, Jane 7 Halswell, Hugh 6 Halswell, Nicholas 5 Halswell, Robert 4 Halswell, Nicholas 3 Halswell, John 2 Halswell, Richard 1 Halswell, Edward Plantagenet 14, Charles John 13, Charles Kemeys 12, John Johnson, John Johnson). She married William Arnold Riley on 12 Jun

87 Generation 15 (con't) William Arnold Riley and Mary Vincentia Blanche Edwardrina Kemeys-Tynte had the following child: 24. i. PRISCILLA ANNE 16 RILEY. She married (1) DESMOND AGAR-ELLIS KER. He was born in Torquay. 21. BEATRICE MARGARET GWLADYS CLARE 15 KEMEYS-TYNTE (Edward Plantagenet 14, Charles John 13, Charles Kemeys 12, Jane 11 Hassel, Jane 10 Tynte, John 9 Tynte, Halswell 8 Tynte, Jane 7 Halswell, Hugh 6 Halswell, Nicholas 5 Halswell, Robert 4 Halswell, Nicholas 3 Halswell, John 2 Halswell, Richard 1 Halswell, Edward Plantagenet 14, Charles John 13, Charles Kemeys 12, John Johnson, John Johnson). She married Eric Blake Herbert Johnson, son of George Herbert Johnson, on 27 Apr Eric Blake Herbert Johnson and Beatrice Margaret Gwladys Clare Kemeys-Tynte had the following child: Generation i. ROSEMARY ANNE 16 JOHNSON was born on 19 Feb She married James Oliver Young on 05 Nov CHARLES THEODORE HALSWELL 16 KEMEYS-TYNTE (Halswell Milborne 15, Charles Kemeys 14, Charles John 13, Charles Kemeys 12, Jane 11 Hassel, Jane 10 Tynte, John 9 Tynte, Halswell 8 Tynte, Jane 7 Halswell, Hugh 6 Halswell, Nicholas 5 Halswell, Robert 4 Halswell, Nicholas 3 Halswell, John 2 Halswell, Richard 1 Halswell) was born on 18 Sep 1876 in Dover. He died on 04 Mar 1934 in Westminster. He met (1) DOROTHY ELLIS. She was born in She died on 03 Aug Notes for Charles Theodore Halswell Kemeys-Tynte: An unpleasant man, who left instructions that his ashes were not to be buried on the family estates. They are buried under a tree on Wimbledon common. The urn is in the Garden at Southside House. The Georgian part of the house was very severely damaged by a great fire. Fortunately it was well insured. All the plasterwork and pannelling had to be replaced, and so nothing is now original. This work was done to a very high standard in Notes on the Barony of Wharton Burke's Peerage and Baronetage p 2807: "The abeyance of the Barony of Wharton was terminated in his favour by Writ of Summons to Parliament 15 Feb 1916." Phillip, Baron Wharton was Speaker of the House of Commons from 1642 to Sir Thomas Wharton was Controller of the Household of William of Orange. His son was outlawed in 1729 for High Treason. (This was rescinded in 1845 as an error!.) He died in 1729? (but see below) and the Barony and his estates fell to his sisters. The title fell into disuse until it was reclaimed in 1916 by Charles Theodore Halswell Kemeys-Tynte. The case for the claiming of this title is a very interesting one and dates back to an original claim made by his ancestor in George III's reign. The story does that the King finally agreed to restore the title and was about to do so when he suffered one of his severet bouts of madness. The case dragged on through Chancery until it was resolved in It may have been the longest court case ever held in the English courts and is roumoured to have inspired Charles Dickens case of "Jarndice versus Jarndice". Right to the title can and often does pass through the female line. 84

88 Generation 16 (con't) Extract from A Tour In Westmorland by Sir Clement Jones, published 1948, CHAPTER III, THE UPPER EDEN m WHARTON The Whartons of Wharton Hall were "a considerable family" as early as the reign of Edward I. The first of their stock mentioned in the College of Heralds is Thomas de Wahrton who held the manor in the time of Henry VI, but they did not become ennobled until the reign of Henry VIII when Sir Thomas Wharton, knight, was advanced to the dignity of a baron for his signal victory over the Scots at Sollom Moss in Subsequently, with Lord Dacre, he marched into Scotland and captured Dumfries. He was summoned to Parliament as a baron in 1545 and died in His great-grandson Philip, 4th Lord Wharton, was a distinguished Roundhead and Puritan and was colonel of a regiment or horse under Cromwell. He bequeathed 1,050 Bibles to be distributed yearly among that number of children in Westmorland, Cumberland and certain other counties. His son Thomas, 5th Lord Wharton, was one of the most active agents in the revolution which placed William of Orange on the English throne, and though afterwards resolutely opposed to the Tory Ministry in the reign of Anne, nevertheless he was created an earl in 1706 and a marquess in He was known amongst his own party as "Honest Tom Wharton." His son Philip, the 6th baron and 2nd marquess, was but seventeen years of age at the time of his father's death in He was a person of unbounded genius, eloquence and ambition, but he was extravagant in cultivating the arts of popularity and ruined his career by his eccentricity and profligate conduct. Starting as a violent Whig, for his extraordinary services in Parliament and out, he was created, in 1718, Duke of Wharton. After that he set up in opposition to the Whig Ministry, became a Tory, then a Jacobite, then a rebel against his King and country by accepting a commission in the King of Spain's army against Gibraltar. Finally he retired into a Bernardine monastery in Catalonia, where he died childless in 1731, aged 32, when all his titles became extinct, except the barony. 4 Thus the ancient family of Wharton which had flourished in Westmorland for some 500 years came to an end in this district. The estates had previously been sold in 1728 to one of the Lowthers. Charles Theodore Halswell Kemeys-Tynte and Dorothy Ellis had the following children: 26. i. ELIZABETH DOROTHY 17 KEMEYS-TYNTE was born in She died on 04 May 1974 in Portugal. She met (1) DAVID GEORGE ARBUTHNOT. He died in She married St John Vintcent in ii. CHARLES JOHN HALSWELL KEMEYS-TYNTE was born on 12 Jan 1908 in London. He died on 11 Jan 1969 in France. He married Joanna Law-Smith on 01 Sep She was born in Adelaide, Australia. Notes for Charles John Halswell Kemeys-Tynte: Malcom Munthe has houses: Southside House, Wimbledon and Hellens, Much Marcle, Herefordshire, which contain the KT paintings. These houses are open for 50 days a year at weekends. Southside Jan to Jun and Hellens Easter to Oct. Munthe died in 1995 and his son, Adam Munthe is present chairman of the Family Trust. He is unwilling to allow photos of the paintings for security reasons. House History Subsequent to Sale until 1998 Halswell house was sold to Mr Clarence (Gassy) Harris after the 2nd World War. Harris had made his fortune when the Taunton gas Company was nationalized and he had ploughed the proceeds back into his country house empire. When he died in 1982 it is estimated that he owned more historic houses than the National Trust 85

89 Generation 16 (con't) in 1982 it is estimated that he owned more historic houses than the National Trust (source Sunday Telegraph 17 July 1994). Harris used his houses to give returning servicemen somewhere pleasant to live and he divided the house into flats. This saved the house but spoilt the interior. On Harris's death the house was bought by the distinguished garden conservator John Tuckey who went into partnership with a local solicitor, Timothy Davey. Tuckey began work on the garden but, in 1991 abandoned this. Then began money making schemes including a rest home for old people, a museum and a garden centre and for the front section to be used for office accommodation. None of this succeeded and the Council used the house to accommodate council tenants. This lasted only a few months and then things began to move downhill. In 1993 Mr Tuckey became ill and subsequently died. In his will he bequeathed Robin Hood's Hut to the Somerset Building Preservation Trust, who restored it in 1997/98. Halswell house was then sold to a Mr Amir Khadobai's Park Investments Company for 200,000 after an unsuccessful bid by a local residents group who had offered the higher sum of 225,000 in instalments. Mr Khadobai never lived in the house which remained empty. In 1997 it was again put on the market. No successful bids have so far been accepted. However the District Council have issued compulsory repairs notices on the rock work screen, the pyramid, the garden wall and the rear wall of the house. Work was in progress on these in EUSTACE 16 KEMEYS-TYNTE (Halswell Milborne 15, Charles Kemeys 14, Charles John 13, Charles Kemeys 12, Jane 11 Hassel, Jane 10 Tynte, John 9 Tynte, Halswell 8 Tynte, Jane 7 Halswell, Hugh 6 Halswell, Nicholas 5 Halswell, Robert 4 Halswell, Nicholas 3 Halswell, John 2 Halswell, Richard 1 Halswell) was born on 10 Apr 1878 in Bath. He died on 11 Nov 1949 in Llandridod Wells in Wales. He married Annie Emerson on 13 Aug 1902 in Michaelstone y Vedw. She was born in She died on 19 Jan Eustace Kemeys-Tynte and Annie Emerson had the following children: i. NICHOLAS HALSWELL 17 KEMEYS-TYNTE was born on 04 Aug 1903 in Cefn Mably Glamorgan. He died on 08 Mar 1975 in Llandridod Wells in Wales. ii. ELEANOR VANESSA ROSABELLE KEMEYS-TYNTE was born on 27 Dec 1904 in Cefn Mably Glamorgan. She died on 26 May 1984 in Llandridod Wells in Wales. Notes for Eleanor Vanessa Rosabelle Kemeys-Tynte: KEMEYS-TYNTE Estate and family records of Kemeys and Kemeys-Tynte of Keven Mably (Cefn Mabli), co. Monmouth, mainly 18th-19th cent., the correspondence mainly 17th-18th cent. The main Kemeys-Tynte archive is in Glamorgan R O; another group is in Gwent R O. Kemeys-Tynte Papers (1991), 71pp. (vol. I); (1992), 157pp. (vol. II, correspondence). Annual Report , p.41. see Web: PRISCILLA ANNE 16 RILEY (Mary Vincentia Blanche Edwardrina 15 Kemeys-Tynte, Edward Plantagenet 14 Kemeys-Tynte, Charles John 13 Kemeys-Tynte, Charles Kemeys 12 Kemeys-Tynte, Jane 11 Hassel, Jane 10 Tynte, John 9 Tynte, Halswell 8 Tynte, Jane 7 Halswell, Hugh 6 Halswell, Nicholas 5 Halswell, Robert 4 Halswell, Nicholas 3 Halswell, John 2 Halswell, Richard 1 Halswell, William Arnold). She married (1) DESMOND AGAR-ELLIS KER. He was born in Torquay. Notes for Priscilla Anne Riley: Desmond Agar-Ellis Ker and Priscilla Anne Riley had the following children: 86

90 Generation 16 (con't) i. STEPHEN CHARLES 17 KER was born on 07 Dec ii. BRIGID ALISON KER. She married (1) JOHN BENJAMIN GRIFFIN. He was born in Salisbury. 25. ROSEMARY ANNE 16 JOHNSON (Beatrice Margaret Gwladys Clare 15 Kemeys-Tynte, Edward Plantagenet 14 Kemeys-Tynte, Charles John 13 Kemeys-Tynte, Charles Kemeys 12 Kemeys-Tynte, Jane 11 Hassel, Jane 10 Tynte, John 9 Tynte, Halswell 8 Tynte, Jane 7 Halswell, Hugh 6 Halswell, Nicholas 5 Halswell, Robert 4 Halswell, Nicholas 3 Halswell, John 2 Halswell, Richard 1 Halswell) was born on 19 Feb She married James Oliver Young on 05 Nov Generation 17 James Oliver Young and Rosemary Anne Johnson had the following children: i. JANE ELIZABETH 17 YOUNG was born on 21 Oct ii. CAROLINE ANNE YOUNG was born on 18 Jan ELIZABETH DOROTHY 17 KEMEYS-TYNTE (Charles Theodore Halswell 16, Halswell Milborne 15, Charles Kemeys 14, Charles John 13, Charles Kemeys 12, Jane 11 Hassel, Jane 10 Tynte, John 9 Tynte, Halswell 8 Tynte, Jane 7 Halswell, Hugh 6 Halswell, Nicholas 5 Halswell, Robert 4 Halswell, Nicholas 3 Halswell, John 2 Halswell, Richard 1 Halswell) was born in She died on 04 May 1974 in Portugal. She met (1) DAVID GEORGE ARBUTHNOT. He died in She married St John Vintcent in David George Arbuthnot and Elizabeth Dorothy Kemeys-Tynte had the following children: 28. i. MYRTLE OLIVE FELIX 18 ARBUTHNOT was born on 20 Feb 1934 in Aka Ziki. She died on 15 May She married Henry Macleod Robertson, son of Henry Robertson, on 17 Nov He died in ii. CAROLINE ELIZABETH ARBUTHNOT was born on 28 Aug She married Jonathan Cecil Appleyard-List in BRIGID ALISON 17 KER (Priscilla Anne 16 Riley, Mary Vincentia Blanche Edwardrina 15 Kemeys-Tynte, Edward Plantagenet 14 Kemeys-Tynte, Charles John 13 Kemeys-Tynte, Charles Kemeys 12 Kemeys-Tynte, Jane 11 Hassel, Jane 10 Tynte, John 9 Tynte, Halswell 8 Tynte, Jane 7 Halswell, Hugh 6 Halswell, Nicholas 5 Halswell, Robert 4 Halswell, Nicholas 3 Halswell, John 2 Halswell, Richard 1 Halswell, Desmond Agar-Ellis). She married (1) JOHN BENJAMIN GRIFFIN. He was born in Salisbury. Generation 18 John Benjamin Griffin and Brigid Alison Ker had the following children: i. ANDREW JOHN 18 GRIFFIN was born on 08 Nov ii. EDWARD JAMES GRIFFIN was born on 19 Apr MYRTLE OLIVE FELIX 18 ARBUTHNOT (Elizabeth Dorothy 17 Kemeys-Tynte, Charles Theodore Halswell 16 Kemeys-Tynte, Halswell Milborne 15 Kemeys-Tynte, Charles Kemeys 14 Kemeys-Tynte, Charles John 13 Kemeys-Tynte, Charles Kemeys 12 Kemeys-Tynte, Jane 11 Hassel, Jane 10 Tynte, John 9 Tynte, Halswell 8 Tynte, Jane 7 Halswell, Hugh 6 Halswell, Nicholas 5 Halswell, Robert 4 Halswell, Nicholas 3 Halswell, John 2 Halswell, Richard 1 Halswell) was born on 20 Feb 1934 in Aka Ziki. She died on 15 May She married Henry Macleod Robertson, son of Henry Robertson, on 17 Nov He died in Notes for Myrtle Olive Felix Arbuthnot: The Halswell Park Trust was created in 1994 to oversee the the garden buildings at Halswell Park and open them to the Public. The Trust then widened its objectives to enable it to acquire land and buildings. The Trust Leases the Temple of Harmony from the Somerset Buildings Preservation Trust who acquired the site and structure and restored it in 1995/6. It is now opened to the public at weekend during the summer by the Trust. 87

91 Generation 18 (con't) The marble statue of Terpsichore (the muse of song and dance) is by John Walsh of London. The statue which now stands in the Temple is a copy, the original being in the County Museum at Taunton Castle. This copy, in terracota, to a formula similar to Coade Stone, was made by Philip Thomason of Cudworth A subsequent owner of the House, John Tuckey, left Robin Hood's Hut to the Somerset Buildings Trust in his will. This was fully restored in 1998 by this Trust and will be probably be leased to the Landmark Trust who may further convert it to sub let for short holiday occupancy by couples Obituary Guardian 17 May 2000 Baroness Wharton Baroness Wharton, known as "Ziki", who has died of sporadic CJD aged 66, was a photographer and animal lover who became vice-president of the RSPCA in 1997 and joint secretary of the all-party parliamentary group for animal welfare. She was described as a "very lively, bubbly kind of person" and a "brilliant photographer" by fellow photographer Austin Mitchell, the Labour MP who shared with her the chairmanship of the all-party media group. Wharton was a crossbench peer who sought, unsuccessfully, to remain in the Lords in their November 1999 election, following the government's constitutional reform that removed hereditaries' voting rights. She had spoken often on animal welfare since 1990, when she revived the family title, which had fallen into abeyance on her mother's death in Although the form of CJD from which she died has not been linked to BSE, Wharton spoke about the disease in the May1991 debate on the hygienic disposal of horses' carcasses, which were being abandoned on wasteground in the wake of the BSE scare. She also strongly supported Lord (Douglas) Houghton's dog control and welfare bill in 1993, sharply attacking "sub-standard" puppy farms in Wales. She sought to restore discretion to the courts, without which allegedly dangerous dogs were locked up for years on end. She told their lordships: "I would like to see the sale of pets from shops ended altogether. If one wants a pedigree dog, then why not buy it from a reputable breeder, whose establishment has been checked, or, preferably, from a dogs' home, thereby giving an abandoned dog a chance of a decent life?" Wharton had a very practical approach to legislation, guessing that she would have been arrested for aggravated offence after the 1991 Dangerous Dogs Act came into effect. As she told the Lords: "I answered my front door to an extremely unsavoury character, who promptly put his foot inside the door and started to push it open. My dog was lying on the floor behind me. On impulse, I pulled the door wide open and shouted to my dog: 'Get him!' That docile labrador leapt up, chased the man down the drive, caught his leg and tore his trousers. My dog was protecting me. I believed that! was in danger?' In February 1994, Wharton utiised the experience of her other principal interest, photography, to criticise Lord Harmar-Nicholls's harshly-worded bill to curb the activities of the paparazzi. She warned him against imposing too harsh a ban on intrusive photographs, and pressed, instead, for sanctions to be aimed at the publishers of offensive photographs rather than the photographers. "People in the public eye, be they in the entertainment industry or politicians, are well aware that in public places they are liable to be photographed by professionals and amateurs alike:' she said. "They are of interest to the public. That is what much of photo-journalism is about. Indeed, many such people have publicity agents, whose job it is to keep their names and faces before the public. "Having said that, I agree that some restrictions need to be imposed upon the continual abuse of someone's privacy which, of course, is not in the public interest." Wharton was the daughter of David George Arbuthnot and Elizabeth Dorothy, the 10th Baroness Wharton. She was educated at the Herschel school for girls in Clarement, Cape Province, South Africa. "When I lived in South Africa, I felt proud of all things British," she told the Lords in February "1 can still hear 'This is London calling followed by the chimes of Big Ben. My favourite programme then was Much Binding In The Marsh." 88

92 Generation 18 (con't) then was Much Binding In The Marsh." In 1958, Wharton married Henry Macleod Robertson, ~ Elgin, Morayshire, by whom she had three sons (including twins) and one daughter. Her husband predeceased her; the heir to her title is her son, Myles. Andrew Roth Myrtle Olive Felix 'Ziki' Robertson, Baroness Wharton, hereditary peer and animal rights campaigner, born February 20th, 1934; died May 15th, Obituary Daily Telegraph 17 May 2000 LADY WHARTON, the campaigner for animal welfare who has died aged 66, became in 1990 the 11th holder of the Wharton barony through an unlikely series of historical twists. Lady Wharton was vice-president of the RSPCA from 1997, and last year played a leading role in closing legal loopholes which had allowed puppy farms. She also campaigned successfully for the replacement of quarantine with a system of pet passports. Another of her achievements was an amendment to the 1991 Dangerous Dogs Act to ensure that dogs impounded under the act were not automatically destroyed. A firm opponent of hunting, she supported the Bill sponsored by Michael Foster to outlaw the sport; but this came to nothing. Myrtle Olive Felix Arbuthnot was born on February , the eldest daughter of Elizabeth, Lady Wharton, by her first husband, David Arbuthnot. The barony had been created in the 16th century for Thomas Wharton, an MP in Henry VIII's time who in 1542 gave a good account of himself against James V of Scotland at the battle of Solway Moss. The most colourful figure to inherit the Wharton title, however was the 6th Baron, Philip. Renowned as one of the most profligate rakes in an era given to profligacy, he became the 1st (and last) Duke of Wharton in 1718 at the age of 19. This was an attempt by the authorities to make him a good Whig like his father Thomas (author of the lyrics to the Protestant rallying song Lilliburlero). But Wharton - drunkard, womaniser, spendthrift, gambler, turncoat in politics and convert in religion -married an Irish Maid of Honour to the Queen of Spain and, in 1727, commanded a Spanish detachment during the siege of Gibraltar. As a result, he forfeited all his titles and estates in Britain. Having already run through a vast fortune, he died a penniless beggar at the age of 32. It was thought at the time that all his titles became extinct. But in 1915 the House of Lords deemed that the barony had been created by writ, and could therefore descend to heirs general including females. The revived title was taken up by Lady Wharton's grandfather, Charles KemeysTynte, a descendant of the 4th Baron through the female line. Kemeys-Tynte became the 8th Baron in When his son, the 9th Baron, died leaving no heirs, the title passed to his sister Elizabeth. Her daughter Myrtle (always known as Ziki to her friends) was brought up in South Africa where she was educated at Herschel School for Girls, in Cape Province. In 1958 she married Henry McLeod Robertson, a Scottish composer and film producer; she herself worked as a professional photographer. When her mother died in 1974, the barony again fell into abeyance until 1990, when it was determined in her favour. Lady Wharton was an assiduous member of the Lords. She was joint secretary of the All-Party Parliamentary Group for Animal Welfare and secretary of the all-party group Fund for the Replacement of Animals in Medical Experiments. She was co-vice-chairman of the all-party Photographic Group and the all-party Media Group. In 1999, with the Labour MP Austin Mitchell, she produced the book of photographs Parliament in Pictures. In November 1999 Lady Wharton was one of the hereditary peers elected to stay on in the House of Lords. Lady Wharton's husband died in She is survived by three sons and a daughter. Her eldest 89

93 Generation 18 (con't) Lady Wharton's husband died in She is survived by three sons and a daughter. Her eldest son, Myles Christopher David Robertson, born in 1964, succeeds to the barony. Notes for Henry Macleod Robertson: Obituary Daily Telegraph 17 May 2000 LADY WHARTON In 1958 she married Henry McLeod Robertson, a Scottish composer and film producer; she herself worked as a professional photographer. When her mother died in 1974, the barony again fell into abeyance until 1990, when it was determined in her favour. Henry Macleod Robertson and Myrtle Olive Felix Arbuthnot had the following children: i. MYLES 19 ROBERTSON was born on 01 Oct Notes for Myles Robertson: HOUSE OF LORDS MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS Die Martis 8 Aprilis 2003 The House met at half-past two o clock. PRAYERS were read by the Lord Bishop of Portsmouth. 1. Royal Assent-The Lord Speaker (Lord Grenfell) notified the Queen s Assent to the following Acts: Health (Wales) Act c. 4 Community Care (Delayed Discharges etc.) Act c. 5 Police (Northern Ireland) Act c Barony of Wharton in the peerage of England-The Lord Chancellor reported that Myles Christopher David Robertson had established his succession to the Barony of Wharton in the peerage of England. The Clerk of the Parliaments was accordingly directed to enter the Lord Wharton on the register of hereditary peers maintained under Standing Order 10(5). Judicial Business ii. LESLEY ROBERTSON was born on 26 May iii. CHRISTOPHER JAMES ROBERTSON was born on 24 Dec iv. NICHOLAS CHARLES ROBERTSON was born on 24 Dec CAROLINE ELIZABETH 18 ARBUTHNOT (Elizabeth Dorothy 17 Kemeys-Tynte, Charles Theodore Halswell 16 Kemeys-Tynte, Halswell Milborne 15 Kemeys-Tynte, Charles Kemeys 14 Kemeys-Tynte, Charles John 13 Kemeys-Tynte, Charles Kemeys 12 Kemeys-Tynte, Jane 11 Hassel, Jane 10 Tynte, John 9 Tynte, Halswell 8 Tynte, Jane 7 Halswell, Hugh 6 Halswell, Nicholas 5 Halswell, Robert 4 Halswell, Nicholas 3 Halswell, John 2 Halswell, Richard 1 Halswell) was born on 28 Aug She married Jonathan Cecil Appleyard-List in Jonathan Cecil Appleyard-List and Caroline Elizabeth Arbuthnot had the following child: i. ZOE 19 APPLEYARD-LIST was born in

94 Sir Nicholas Halswell and his wife Bridget (Three Effigies in Goathurst Church ) Carving found in Grotto presumably of Sir Nicholas Halswell Sir Charles Kemeys Tynte, marble bas relief by Nollekens in Goathurst Church 91

95 The replica Urn in Hestercombe Gardens which commemorates the friendship of Charles Tynte, Henry Hoare and Bamfyld Possibly Rachel, second wife of Charles Kemeys Kemeys-Tynte's, with his first wife's children and her baby, Rachel. 92

96 Robin Hood's Hut just after its restoration The Dovecot at Halswell House under restoratuon 2006, walls are made of new cob. 93

97 Halswell House Massive Stuart front with Tudor Manor tucked in behind. Terpsichore: Exquisite Coad stone replica of Walsh's Statue in Somerset County Museum, Taunton. 94

98 The Temple of Harmony Mill Wood

99 Aerial shot of Millwood with the watercourse diagonally at center and Temple at bottom right 2006 MIll Wood Grotto and source spring and plaque with poem Jun

100 Mill Wood Upper pond June 2013 The Bath Stone Bridge

101 Pond above Bath storne Bridge June13 The cascade June 2013 Mill Wood, the lowest pond and tiny island covered in weed poplars, June

102 99

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